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Jordan_E

Drop a Ton Challenge 2010

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Got into town early this morning and, as I had hoped, I managed to re-trace that final 3.7 miles of the course in honour of the runner who didn't make it last Sunday. The Mall (red road that leads to/from Buckingham Palace where the Marathon ends) was closed off to traffic today for some reason so it was nice to run down it again rather than be forced to finish to the side on the pavement. Legs were good and I was back to sub-10min mile pace, though my quads later began to ache a little so I still need another week to fully recover. I'll rest until Wednesday then add in a couple of short runs again over the latter half of the week. Today's run was the first time I got to use Garmin's custom course mapping function which you access via their web app before sending a saved course to your device. It worked brilliantly. 

 

I've still got this achilles strain that I had before the marathon, so really need to work on that and improving my ankle mobility in general as it might be the source of my inability to squat low.I have a resistance band and have found some good youtube videos to hopefully help me solve the problems. My olympic barbell weights set arrived on Friday and I'm very pleased with it. I'm just working with the bar alone for a week or so to try and find decent form, and until my mobility improves to do squats I plan to pretty much exclusively do deadlifts for a while since they're safe and work pretty much every part of the body which should hopefully make it easier for me to then progress to doing complexes (again, once I can squat low). 

 

Re-working my meal and weekly exercise plans now too to accommodate the weight training and so on. Running wise I am going to stick to the same days the Hal Higdon Marathon training plan had me running (tues, weds, thurs and saturdays) and I will alternate the distances so the weekday runs will be anywhere between 3-8 miles, and weekend runs anywhere between 10-18. The weekday runs will be a lot easier now that it's lighter in the mornings, and I will probably try to nail doing tempo runs effectively on one or two of those days as I'd like to figure out how to do those properly. Higdon has a plan to steadily get runners back to a regular regime post Marathon so I'll be following that first.

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1 pound away from my next goal.  And then it's the long slog toward the goal after that!  Got all summer, though.  

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Reached that 1 lb., but been kind of back and forth since then, going up 1 or 2 and then back, but not breaking through any lower.  Not discouraged.  Only thing that discouraged me was my walk last night; knee really gave me troubles 3/4 into the walk and I was limping by the time I got home.  Getting old BLOWS!

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And for the first time in 11 years, I got back to weight lifting.  I had leg day two days ago, and I'm feeling it in my hamstrings (which I used to rarely work out, but it's now a part of my routine) and my hip abductors and hip adductors.  Holy crap I can barely walk.

 

Today is chest, core, and back.  Gonna keep this up.

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Lifting is all I've been doing for the last month. I'm still lacking good dorsiflexion to do squats with decent form, so I'm sticking to deadlifts mostly along with some other strength training exercises (dumbbell squats...etc). I workout for about 35-40mins three times a week, my eating has been clean and I'm still losing about 1.5lbs a week. I don't have space for a bench or a rack so I am quite limited in what I can do with my barbell set. If I can afford it later in the year I may see what strength only gyms there are near me.

 

I think my Achilles pain has passed now so I may actually go for a short run tomorrow, which would be first in several weeks due to the ankle pain. I need to find a balance for cardio alongside the strength training as having stuck to strength training and seen visible results I wan't to keep my focus there for a while. After a good workout session I can honestly say I feel as mentally energised as I do after a great run. Really enjoying it and am still kicking myself for not turning to weights years ago. My Garmin has proved a good companion in strength training too. It is quite good at recognising a number of moves, and it consistently recognises push ups too (anything it fails to log you can easily edit and correct via the Garmin app). 

 

It's funny how I have often said that I felt I had about 10-12lbs to lose several times in the past when it turns out I was actually a ways off. I've always carried my weight somewhat well all things considered, perhaps helped by having never been a drinker, so I never knew how much I was actually packing away. Now I can confidently say that I am definitely about 10-12 away from where I want to be in terms of body fat, and where calculations suggest my weight should be for my age/height. It's the worst kind of flab left though, loose and squishy, sitting unevenly over the body. 

 

So far the weight training has shown benefits mostly in toning and strength, which is what I was looking for until I get more fat burned off, then I can amend my eating regime to focus more on packing on some muscle mass to help me fill out again (I've already made an alteration to favour protein a bit more in recent weeks, but come August I can hopefully focus more heavily and also begin weekly meal prep).  It's great adding more weight to the barbell every couple of weeks, and even noticing how much easier push ups have become and how my form has improved. I really must add yoga back into the mix more regularly too though. I've been bad neglecting that, but now I am stronger I can probably push myself harder there too.

 

Best thing since I started lifting? Lower back pain I used to get has been banished. Not had so much as a minor ache in over a month. 

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It's funny you mention back pain.  While I was washing dishes during a 2014 Thanksgiving buffet at the hotel I used to work at (I feel like I've told this story a million times), I was squatting down to get something when I felt something "happen" in my knee.  Needless to say, I've had knee pain since until I started working out weeks ago.  It's weird, but I was afraid of doing any leg exercises like squats and presses with that knee pain.  The irony is that once I started those exercises, the pain pretty much disappeared.

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It doesn't seem to take long for muscles to respond to regular workouts. So with my back, the first day I was doing deadlifts my body went into a WTF mode as I was triggering muscles that I never really challenged before, so I did have some minor aches for a couple of hours, but with repetition I think the body accepts what you're doing and will quickly adapt within days. A similar thing happened with my knees and dumbbell squats. I found that when running too. I could not fathom how my body would cope with 18 weeks of marathon training, but it did, so I am kind of inspired this year to start seeing just how far I can push my body and change its composition. 

 

I got a brief run in this morning which was fine. I can definitely feel the difference in strength and my posture, but it was still exhausting as I often find runs to be when I've taken a break for several weeks. Still not sure how I will work in runs around the weight training but it'd be good to at least fit two in a week for the month ahead.

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It's looking a little too far into the future, but does anybody have an opinion on the importance of shoes?  I've been using some comfortable New Balance shoes (rarely used) that I purchased may be a decade ago.  Still work fine, but do I need to focus on getting separate workout shoes (lifting) and running shoes (cardio)?

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Hit a snag this past weekend as I did something to hurt the ever living hell out of my heel.  I thought I was fine by Monday, but I spent Monday night doing dishes for a while since I was trying to meal prep for the rest of the week.  I ended up re aggravating my heel, and I had to call into work on Wednesday.  It still hurts, but I can at least walk.  I can't believe I'm skipping leg day for this week.

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On 7/7/2018 at 11:48 PM, Dimness said:

It's looking a little too far into the future, but does anybody have an opinion on the importance of shoes?  I've been using some comfortable New Balance shoes (rarely used) that I purchased may be a decade ago.  Still work fine, but do I need to focus on getting separate workout shoes (lifting) and running shoes (cardio)?

 

Shoes for lifting... It depends on one's needs I suspect, and the type of lifting. Some lifters like the raised heel of dedicated lifting shoes and I might consider them down the line as the raise might help with my squat posture given the regular limitation of flexibility I still have. Since I mostly deadlift they're not essential for me. 

 

For running? Absolutely you need good shoes and you should go to a specialist and have your gait evaluated on a treadmill (they'll typically have a camera recording the movement of your feet), at which point they will be able to suggest suitable pairs to go with. Some specialists will also have you run in a pair you're trying and they can monitor your gait that way. I'd recommend reading up on reviews of specialist stores though, just to be more confident you'll get good, knowledgable and attentive staff.

 

I also think we overlook the importance of regular everyday shoes and the role they can play in back, foot and ankle pain. Tough finding a good pair. 

 

 

20 minutes ago, Dimness said:

Hit a snag this past weekend as I did something to hurt the ever living hell out of my heel.  I thought I was fine by Monday, but I spent Monday night doing dishes for a while since I was trying to meal prep for the rest of the week.  I ended up re aggravating my heel, and I had to call into work on Wednesday.  It still hurts, but I can at least walk.  I can't believe I'm skipping leg day for this week.

 

Bah. Hopefully rest and some ice will ease it. I've still got tendonitis in my right heel (that's getting on for three months now). Haven't run in a long time. Been quite busy too so have still yet to put yoga regularly into my regime again. 

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I love how we reliably come up with new extreme diet approaches.  Seems that the consistent effective element of all diets like these tends to be the minimization of high-glycemic foods (sugar/carbs).  Even so, in the case of Jordan Peterson, sounds like dietary-caused inflammation is the crux of his change.  How he talks about his daughter is really interesting.  I'm generally skeptical about people's assertions of magical fixes for ailments via diet changes.  But I believe him that his daughter changing her diet had the positive effects that he claims.  it is just hysterical that veggies were removed from the diet entirely.  And red meat is the focus.  Why not chicken?  Or turkey?

 

To be fair, he's not claiming to be a dietary expert.  He says that overtly and modestly.  I think what he will find is that he'll need to modify his diet a little bit.  Just eating beef and salt will likely cause him problems.  The key is probably just to cut back on the carbs/sugars and I bet he'll realize that soon enough.  He already sorta does.

 

Its making me question my current breakfast choices again(toast, milk, peanutbutter).  Maybe I should try cutting out carbs and dairy for a bit just to see if there is any positive affect.  Besides weight loss.  Digestive.  Inflammation issues I have.

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Jordan_E said:

Officially (although I have been sick for a few days) lost 60 lbs. since starting this diet/lifestyle change.  I still firmly believe in the 16/8 diet more than anything I've come across over the years. 

 

I don’t know if I’ve posted about it here, but I’ve been intermittent fasting 16/8 for about 7-8 years now. I think it’s worth it for the convenience factor alone. 

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12 hours ago, foogledricks said:

 

 

Its making me question my current breakfast choices again(toast, milk, peanutbutter).  Maybe I should try cutting out carbs and dairy for a bit just to see if there is any positive affect.  Besides weight loss.  Digestive.  Inflammation issues I have.

 

 

 

 

I have two comments to this. 1. Yes, cut the carbs and the dairy. I've had ongoing issues for a few years, and I've gotten myself off of acid reflux meds almost completely with these dietary changes. I do occasionally take an omperazole if I know I'm going to cheat, but mostly I just eat 'right'.  2. Breakfast is completely unnecessary. Stop eating breakfast! (not kidding)

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6 hours ago, Starhawk said:

To follow up on @foogledricks post, here’s Peterson’s daughter’s incredible story. 

Thanks for posting this.  God, I'm listening to this now.  It is hard to listen to stories like this.  Someone having mysterious illnesses and no one can help them.  Knowing that things get better in the end helps you push through.

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The video thumbnail is click bait, she never shows a bikini in this interview. ☺️

 

Skip to minute 9. I'll summarize the first nine minutes. She had lots of ailments in her life.  Lots of boring ailments. You're welcome.

 

This topic is interesting, as I've on my own really taken to 'listening' to my body as I eat different foods. I've had different ailments through life, at least since hitting adulthood, and over time I've realized that you really need to try new things with your diet, including stop eating various foods, and paying attention to how your body responds. I've never formally paid attention to any dieting info, tends, fads, etc, but there was a certain point where I realized doctors weren't going to help, at least none of the ones I'd appointed with. For example, with my acid reflux, I never had doctors suggest that I could manage my issues without drugs by simply identifying the particular foods that are triggers for me. (I'm talking general here, because I figure digestion, like many other bodily functions and various organs, can varying person to person in what triggers they are vulnerable to.)  The medical advice I got amounted to, maybe generally speaking I have some undiscovered food allergies, but really it's just part of getting older and I can try X medication. And if it helps, I can take X medication for the rest of my life. The rest of my life! 

 

I slowly started questioning this approach, and then finally at one appointment I came to my 'fuck this' moment. I waited an obsurd length of time in an exam room for a scheduled follow up. I had some issues and thoughts I was ready to run by the doctor, see what's his thoughts were. It never occurred. He came in, I barely got out something along the lines that my acid reflux and seemed to intensify, and without ever looking away from his paperwork said he'd double my daily dose and I could schedule a new appointment and I could let him know how it was going. He opened the door and was away walking down the hall as he was saying this to me.

 

I've never been anything close to a hypercondriac or a needy patient. I'm quite the opposite, I'm a good listener and always intent on following orders and trying to eliminate health issues. If I'm in a doctor's office, you can be sure I'm having real issues and I want to be done with them asap. I thought paying attention to my issues, trying to take note of what may be affecting my body, and conveying that to my care provider was my role. My due diligence!

 

I sat for a second watching him walk away, head down in whatever he was moving on to, and I realized I needed to help myself. (I was probably boiling, but still, the rational underlying realization was determined in that moment) 

 

I still don't even know, is this the core of "the elimination diet"? Cutting out parts of the diet, possibly reintroducing then, and paying attention to your body?

 

I don't think of my diet as set-in-stone, it's an evolution. I figure my body and its motabilism is subject to changes and fluctuations, and I'll always remain cognizant of how it's acting and reacting to my intake. That said, I'm not sure I could ever go all-meat, such as she has, but then again, I not really too far from it these days.

 

There are struggles, such with the suggestion that some meats such as the red meats are bad for your health (per current professional health recommendations). And personally speaking, my body responds to red meats in a mixed way. Sometimes bothering my digestive system, and other times not in any way. (I'm trying to pay close attention here, trying to refine this area. Burgers vs steak, hormones, fat content, etc). I do feel healthier eating red meats however. I feel like I respond well in many ways, such as weight, skin and energy levels, so the occasional (mild) stomach issues are outweighed. But of course  my mind struggles with the potential long term health risks of red meat.

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22 hours ago, Jordan_E said:

Officially (although I have been sick for a few days) lost 60 lbs. since starting this diet/lifestyle change.  I still firmly believe in the 16/8 diet more than anything I've come across over the years.  The pounds don't melt off, but I don't gain either, and that's with being able to eat pretty much anything I want after the 16 hours.  Intermittent fasting works for me, and I don't gorge myself when it is time to eat.  I even try to completely fast for 24 hours at least once every couple of weeks, just to make sure I stay on track.  I'm still shooting for 78 total weight loss.    

 

Can you describe this diet? I'm intrigued. I'm close to 40 in age now and have noticed my weight has started to go up without me changing much in my diet. I've always been overweight but at least it was constant. 

 

What do you eat in the 8 hour period? Have you counted calories just to see how many you consume?

 

 

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1 hour ago, AlbertA said:

 

Can you describe this diet? I'm intrigued. I'm close to 40 in age now and have noticed my weight has started to go up without me changing much in my diet. I've always been overweight but at least it was constant. 

 

What do you eat in the 8 hour period? Have you counted calories just to see how many you consume?

 

 

 

Sounds like Starhawk has been doing it far longer than I have, but I'll try explaining how I'm doing it.

16/8 essentially means you fast completely within the 16 hour time period, which is actually somewhat easy once you add sleep time (for me, that will be from around 7 PM until 11AM, although I try not to eat again until after 12), and eat "normally" within the remaining 8.  Some say smaller portions over the 8 is best, but I usually only eat a small lunch and then dinner.  It is a little tough in the beginning, especially if you are a breakfast person, but I never was, so it was easy for me, but it was the snacking that I had to quit.  Especially since I used to snack like HELL when I write.  As far as counting calories, it sort of comes naturally after a while, especially when you start losing weight.  "Do I really want to eat this?" comes to mind very quickly and automatically.  But, on the other hand, I've had pizza (not counting slices), and woke up the next day and finding that I still lost weight, albeit ounces, not necessarily pounds.  I try to stay within 1600-1800 calories a day, give or take.  It's a matter of staying steadfast with the 16/8 format.  Now, I have this as a prolonged source of losing weight, not a quick drop.  And there are days when I just don't do 16/8, like today, since I just came off being sick for a week and actually have an appetite again.  But once you get used to it, it is easy to get back into the 16/8 cycle.    

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4 hours ago, AlbertA said:

What do you eat in the 8 hour period? Have you counted calories just to see how many you consume?

 

I eat late in the day, so I usually won't break my fast until about 4pm, but I'll eat during that 8 hour window until midnight. I do count calories, but it fluctuates depending on what my workout plan is. Whatever your calorie goal is, one of the benefits to intermittent fasting is you get to have larger, satisfying meals since you are eating in a smaller time frame.

 

During the fasting part, I only drink black coffee and water. I used to be someone who *had* to eat something once my feet hit the floor in the morning, but over time I somehow got over that. If I ever feel hungry, I usually drink some water and the feeling passes. The thought of ever going back to worrying about breakfast and lunch sounds so unappealing to me now.

 

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Thanks for the explanations. 

 

I've never been a breakfast person, though I do tend to more at night. I'll give it a try thanks!

 

 

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6 hours ago, Jordan_E said:

 

 

16/8 essentially means you fast completely within the 16 hour time period, which is actually somewhat easy once you add sleep time (for me, that will be from around 7 PM until 11AM, although I try not to eat again until after 12), and eat "normally" within the remaining 8.  Some say smaller portions over the 8 is best, but I usually only eat a small lunch and then dinner.  It is a little tough in the beginning, especially if you are a breakfast person, but I never was, so it was easy for me, but it was the snacking that I had to quit.  

This thread is fascinating. I've found that I'm unwittingly combining many current approaches to dieting. As I noted to Keith's post, I find breakfast unnecessary, and although breakfast is my favorite meal, I rarely indulge now. I also don't eat/snack after 7pm. So this description of 16/8 is my regular daily regime. 

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It's so awesome that Kevin Smith describes his potato only diet here. I love the radically different diets.  The common thread is usually low carbs.  But also it seems just eating less.  This whole fasting approach is funny too since not too long ago the key to nutrition was to eat small but frequently.  I still think Jillian from biggest loser put it best.  Eat less.  Move more.  That's fucking it.

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Due in no small part to the conversations being had here, I've been experimenting with my diet a bit. I've for two weeks alternated between cutting out breakfast entirely, and having 3 eggs.  This is actually a big change, because my routine is to eat toast with peanut butter and several glasses of milk every morning at 7 am ish.  Now I'm cutting that out entirely, and replacing with 3 eggs every other day.

 

The outcome of the above change is that:

-Turns out I am capable of fasting for quite a few hours, I didn't die of hunger, and I seemed to be perfectly energetic

- I am fearful that I'm going to cause a vitamin D and calcium deficiency.  I'm not sure what to do about that.

- It is unclear to me if I'm creating a ketosis situation or if I'm doing the opposite.  I haven't really lost much weight.  Maybe a pound or 2.  I'm fairly lean to start with (was 167, am 165 and 5'9)

 

Anyway, more than anything this is an experiment.  I need more time to determine if there are any take-aways or permanent behavior changes to follow.  What I do know is the findings have so far made me even more obnoxious than I already was about diet.  Now I'm telling people who are fatter than me "Food and hunger is bullshit, all you have to do is ignore those BS hunger impulses and it is easy to cut back on your eating.  Why are you eating a bowl of cereal right now.  It's like you WANT to get fat.  Do you WANT to get fat?"

 

 

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1 hour ago, foogledricks said:

- I am fearful that I'm going to cause a vitamin D and calcium deficiency.  I'm not sure what to do about that.

 

About 5 years ago, my labs showed my Vitamin D levels were under the normal range. I've since supplemented with 5,000iu of Vitamin D3 per day. Later, my 23andme showed I would be probably be Vitamin D deficient as well.

 

So I'd say supplement. It's a cheap and easy one. 

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