Jump to content
LCVG
Josh

What are you reading?

Recommended Posts

As far as what I recently finished, that would be "The Names" by Don DeLillo. Not his best, in my opinion (that would have to be "White Noise"), but it was an interesting read as a big fan of DeLillo. It was written before his well-known novels, so one could see him forming his voice. Often meandering, but still some beautiful prose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished "The Teeth of the Tiger" by Tom Clancy. Wasn't good at all, IMO!

 

Normally, I enjoy his books very much, but this fell flat.

 

 

Currently Reading: Halo: The Flood. I'm about halfway through and it is excellent. It is almost a scene for scene account of the Master Chief's exploits in the game you may have heard of! ;) Plus it delves into more detail, such as how Keyes fell into the hands of the Covenant.

 

After that, I'll read the Prequel, Halo:The Fall of the Reach (which I understand has insight into the origin of the Spartans and the War with the Covenant).

 

Then it is the one that was just released, Halo:First Strike, which continues the Saga with the events after Halo.

 

One of my Fav's all-time is "The Stand", by Stephen King.

 

Anyone have any recommendations of Sci-Fi books dealing with Time Travel? I would love to read more books which feature time-travel as a central theme.

 

Carlos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished You Shall Know Our Velocity!. I still think it was a mixed bag. Moments of greatness mixed with moments of boredom. Was it good enough to make me pick up Eggers' other book, A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius? Not anytime soon, but maybe.

 

Also finished The Second Coming of Steve Jobs which really wasn't all that good. Maybe the guy's life just doesn't make for that exciting of a bio, but I doubt it. The book was mostly "Steve yelled at this guy... Steve ruined this relationship... Steve backed into this huge success..."

 

Carlos,

Just finished "The Teeth of the Tiger" by Tom Clancy. Wasn't good at all, IMO!

 

That bums me out. My next book is Red Rabbit, which I heard isn't exactly a winner, either. If you read it, what did you think? You asked about books dealing with time travel. I have no suggestions except to stay the hell away from Killing Time by Caleb Carr. What a massive waste.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally posted by Carlucci@Dec 9 2003, 03:25 PM

Anyone have any recommendations of Sci-Fi books dealing with Time Travel? I would love to read more books which feature time-travel as a central theme.

Carlos, my father writes a series of time travel novels. The books are: Time After Time, Twice Upon a Time, Till the End of Time and In Time of War. You can find them here at amazon.com. They're actually pretty good, and cover (in order above) the Russian Revolution, Custer's Last Stand, WWII and the Civil War. Lots of ancillary characters like Mark Twain, JFK, Ambrose Bierce, General Custer and more. He has a bit of a cult following. He also has an unpublished book in the series, Sea of Time, which takes place on the Titanic, which he'll send to fans who request it.

 

You could also try Jack Finney's Time and Again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished How to be Good by Nick Hornby.

 

Then I decided to read the Ender's Game saga again. I've finished Ender's Game, and I'm almost done with Speaker for the Dead.

 

I've only read the first three in the past, so I've asked for the rest for Xmas...

 

If I don't get them, I'll just buy them. :)

 

Glen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've only read the first three in the past, so I've asked for the rest for Xmas...

 

Xenocide is fairly meh for me (I never got into the parts on Path in the slightest and they were horribly excruciating for me). Part of the ending of that book, or maybe it was Children of the Mind, felt like an utter and total cop-out to me with regards to a certain character.

 

Children of the Mind, likewise a let-down. Not an awful book, but Ender's Game & Speaker are both two of my favorite books so it was hard to keep that streak going. Ender's Shadow is quite enjoyable, though some of the liberties Card takes with his own work were irritating as hell (with regards to character abilities/motivations) but it is definitely worth a read.

 

Shadow of the Hegemon was not bad. I am only partly through it, being distracted by school and what-have-ye, but it is quite readable. I think if Xenocide had been a better book the series could have happily ended there, personally, but I guess I'm not a writing big shot ;).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally posted by xPieter@Dec 9 2003, 03:53 PM

My next book is Red Rabbit, which I heard isn't exactly a winner, either. If you read it, what did you think?

 

I stayed away from Red Rabbit because I like what I already know about Jack Ryan's rise. I didn't like the Idea of a prologue to his already well-established past. But maybe I'll read it now that its in paperback.

 

Carlos, my father writes a series of time travel novels.

 

Allen, very awesome! I have some Amazon.com gift certs coming in January, so I'll definitely pick up the first in the series.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anyone have any recommendations of Sci-Fi books dealing with Time Travel? I would love to read more books which feature time-travel as a central theme.

I'd reccomend "The Forever War" by Joe Haldeman. This has been a personal favorite of mine for some time, I usually sit down and read it once a year. The sequel "Forever Peace" was something of a let down.

 

I took a slight detour through some of the last batch of New Jedi Order paperbacks, so I'm only getting around to finishing Songbook by Nick Hornby. It really has been a great collection of pop music essays by someone who really loves the genre. My local B&N has "How to be Good" on clearance, I may need to give that a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally posted by iainl@Nov 19 2003, 02:05 PM

Currently plodding (yes, plodding, its fairly disappointing so far) through Quicksilver, the new Neal Stephenson.

Having gone back to it and pushed a bit further, its really rather good now. Its just that the first 100-150 pages or so are very, very slow to get going. So don't feel too put off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished The Lone Drow by Salvatore. Good quick read. Time to finally dig into Quicksilver. Then I need to reread the "His Dark Materials" trilogy, just because they are so good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Read a few books since my last post here:

 

How To Be Alone by Jonathan Franzen.

Boring & whiny!

 

The Funny Thing Is... by Ellen Degeneres

Mostly entertaining. Won't convert any new fans.

 

Stupid White Men... by Michael Moore

I enjoyed this much more than Al Franken's Lies... because aside from a bunch of complaining about the state of things, Moore provides real solutions, or at the very least, hilariously sarcastic solutions. I know it's a bit out of date now, but I figured I'd read it as a primer for Dude, Where's My Country? which I plan on reading next.

 

...and I'm still on page 60-something of Red Rabbit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been reading fantasy lately. Right now, I'm in the middle of reading Barry Hughart's Bridge of Birds. It apparently won a World Fantasy award in the mid-80's, a couple of sequels trickled out over the next few years, and then the book fell into relative obscurity. It's set in a mythical version of ancient China, in which a young man has to recruit the services of a wise man to find a cure for a plague that's afflicting the children of his village. Lots of adventure with a good sense of humor; kind of reminds me of an Asian equivalent to The Princess Bride. And since this is a video game board, I guess I should mention that this is apparently on the required reading list for Bioware as they get Jade Empire ready :)

 

I also picked up a copy of The Coming of Conan the Cimmerian by Robert E. Howard. It's a trade paperback reprint of a really spectacular UK edition that came out a couple of years ago and contained Howard's original Conan stories without editing by Lin Carter or L. Sprague DeCamp or anyone else that might have messed with the text. Also includes illustrations by Mark Schultz (I'm a big Xenozoic Tales fan), and behind the scenes stuff like early drafts, maps, essays, and story fragments. Highest recommendation if you dig Conan (and Solomon Kane and Bran Mak Morn collections are coming in the future, along with even more Conan) :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, I forgot about this thread...

 

Right now I'm just starting my first-ever Salman Rushdie novel, Shame. So far it's not at all what I was expecting, it's very funny and filled with hilarious (and apt!) metaphors that almost remind me of Tom Robbins. At any rate, it looks like it's going to be fun. I especially enjoyed the end of the first chapter:

"Dizzy, peripheral, inverted, infatuated, stargazing, fat: what manner of hero is this?"

:lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm working on the latest installment in Stephen King's The Dark Tower series, Wolves of the Calla. So far I'm enjoying it greatly. It's hard to say what it is exactly I like about The Dark Tower series, but the books are definitely among my favorites by King. I'm glad he finally got the rest of the series written (though not yet published), although I admit I am slightly worried that whatever ending he has come up with won't live up to my expectations - Not that I doubt his story-telling abilities, but it's such an epic story that I wonder if any ending will be satisfactory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently read The Years of Rice and Salt, by Kim Stanley Robinson, and can recommend it. From the Amazon blurb:

 

Award-winning author Kim Stanley Robinson delivers a thoughtful and powerful examination of cultures and the people who shape them. How might human history be different if 14th-century Europe was utterly wiped out by plague, and Islamic and Buddhist societies emerged as the world's dominant religious and political forces? The Years of Rice and Salt considers this question through the stories of individuals who experience and influence various crucial periods in the seven centuries that follow. The credible alternate history that Robinson constructs becomes the framework for a tapestry of ideas about philosophy, science, theology, and politics.

 

At the heart of the story are fundamental questions: what is the purpose of life and death? Are we eternal? Do our choices matter? The particular achievement of this book is that it weaves these threads into a story that is both intellectually and emotionally engaging. This is a highly recommended, challenging, and ambitious work.

 

I wish there was more serious scifi like this.

 

-j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle

The best I can offer is that if you want to like this book, you will. If you don't, you won't. I landed exactly in the middle. My family had read this book when my Mom was struggling with cancer. I was never really interested and so, at the time, passed on it. It's been two years since she died and I concluded it was time to see what all the fuss was about. So you could say I went into it wanting to get something inspiring out the read, but wasn't expecting to. Hence, my mediocre feelings for it.

 

I found the book to be mostly common sense, mostly repetitive, and extremely relaxing. And I don't mean it in that sarcastic "put me to sleep" sense, but truly calming. In fact, it's the first book I mostly read in bed after waking up as opposed to the usual reading before falling asleep. I like starting my day with it. The tone often put me in a very pleasant mood for work; giving me peace and putting a smile on my face.

 

In a Sunburned Country by Bill Bryson

Small note here to say that I'm halfway through this book and think it's terrific. Will report more when I finish...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished In a Sunburned Country and want to let all who are curious know that it is a great little book. The mix of amazing facts and strange tales really intrigued me.

 

Next on the table is Utopia by Lincoln Child. Anyone already read it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally finished Constructing a Language : A Usage-Based Theory of Language Acquisition, which has radically changed my ideas about how language arises and what kinds of skills and mental processes it involves. Awesome book, but very very dense. It totally contradicts the 'standard' view of language acquisition that has dominated linguistics since Chomsky, but IMO it all but demolishes it with a much more sound and realistic theory.

 

I'm about 1/3 through Grooming, Gossip, and the Evolution of Language, which is a much easier book to read, but no less fascinating. It looks at language as homo sapein's equivalent to grooming among monkeys and chimps, being that grooming is what cements their communities, it's the currency with which they indicate their alliances and coalitions. This book, and the research that went into it, has been widely cited by other anthropologists, psychologists, darwinists, and others because it makes a compelling case that language may have gotten it's start as a verbal grooming technique, where people exchange information, usually in the form of gossip in small communities, as a way of showing allegiance, trust(worthiness) to others...as a way of bonding with your 'group'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I havent read much of anything recently but im half way done with the DS9 anthology book called "Prophecy and Change" . Its very good and fills in the gaps during the series.

 

Im also half way done with Allen's fathers first book which i picked up a while ago but havent been able to finish due to a lot of gaming :-) . Also have the others which ill read afterwards

 

capt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool, Joey, hope you like them.

 

Damn, Ed, do you ever read novels? Maybe even a comic book? My lips get tired just reading the titles of the books you like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Miyamoto Musashi, The Book of Five Rings

Dante Alighieri, The Divine Comedy Volume 1 ? Inferno

 

Got a handful of other books I wanna read but I'm actually in the middle of writing my third book :?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Volume Two of Neal Stephenson's Baroque Cyle, The Confusion, came out the beginning of the month, and I've just found out. So I popped down to Borders yesterday, and started it last night. For those that remember my initial post about Volume One, I wasn't that keen, but its come on in leaps and bounds - Half Cocked Jack rules.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...