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Nintendo Switch discussion thread (It's out. It's good. Even the chump who started this thread finally bought one. Deal with it.)

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29 minutes ago, iainl said:

The sooner we get a real Pikmin 4, the sooner I can wash the taste of the TERRIBLE 3DS version away. It's an abomination.

 

Wow. Glad I didn't get it then. I have the demo installed on my 3DS, but never got around to playing it.

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If what you want is a mediocre 2D Lemmings thing then it's not as awful as I suggest there. But it's about as much a Pikmin game as Mario Party is a direct sequel to Super Mario 64.

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Hmmm, while I'll certainly welcome Tropical Freeze coming as well (never had a Wii-U), I'm actually kinda jazzed about Mario Tennis. That and hopefully they continue that trend and bring a full blown Mario Golf to the table as well. Add Wave Race and F-Zero and I'll be pretty damn happy. 

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I’m glad to see there are some more WiiU ports coming, and welcome more. My only concern with them could be the price they release at. Mario Kart was full price, and could be justified by it including all the DLC, and that it is Mario Kart, which holds its value very well.

 

I’ll be annoyed if Tropical Freeze launches at full price though. It’s a pretty old game and can be found on WiiU pretty cheap. I’m certainly not going to be willing to pay $60 (or actually $80 here) for it. 

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Have a late Christmas/Birthday present on the way next week so I need to get some games that are good in small chunks. Mario Kart is a must. Anyone play Splatoon 2?  Tetris? Bomberman? I can borrow Phil’s Copy of Mario, and . Zelda I will get eventually once I finish some of the longer games I have on other consoles.

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Splatoon 2 is fun and needs no voice chat which is good. Rounds are also super quick so you can easily hop into a match and out again in ten minutes.

 

Tetris is a fantastic version of that game and super customizable. My gf and I play it a bunch and 4 player is a hoot.

 

If you have couch co-op ever, Crawl is a blast for 4 and highly recommended at the price.

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22 hours ago, King of All Cosmos said:

I would kill for a Mario Sunshine HD on Switch. It's a travesty how they've neglected to port the best game in the franchise on subsequent consoles.

 

I'm REALLY hoping that have ambitious plans for Cube and Wii titles on the Switch Virtual Console. What I have seen of Sunshine running on the Dolphin emulator is very impressive. What Nintendo are doing with Nvidia in China and putting our remastered titles like Galaxy...etc gives me hope for what is to eventually come in the west. 

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12 hours ago, Magness said:

Seconded Splatoon and Tetris - both are excellent

 

Bought both today with Mario Kart, now the wait for the system to arrive,

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I highly recommend Blossom Tales on the e-Shop. Its $15 and is an homage to A Link to the Past. 

 

 -Dean-

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3 minutes ago, EnemaEms said:

I highly recommend Blossom Tales on the e-Shop. Its $15 and is an homage to A Link to the Past. 

 

 -Dean-

 

That’s been selling very well on Switch apparently. I’ll definitely add it to my wish list.

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Our board game night turned into 4 player Mario Kart night, and that was fine by me. No matter the version, it is always a blast.

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The Variety Kit is $70, and the Robot Kit is $80. Not sure on UK pricing yet.

 

Guardian article:

 

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Inside the Nintendo Labo box are 25 sheets of thick, brown, branded cardboard, and a little cartridge that pops into a Nintendo Switch console. Following Lego-like instructions on the Switch screen, you punch out the cardboard pieces and assemble them into contraptions of varying complexity. The first project, which takes maybe 15 minutes, is a simple little bug-like radio-controlled car; slot the Joy-Con controllers into its cardboard sides, pull up the controls on the Switch’s screen, and the vibrations send it juddering across a flat surface with surprising speed.

 

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The more complex constructions are a telescopic fishing rod with a working reel, attached to a base with elastic bands and string for realistic tension; a cardboard model of a piano with springy keys; an abstract motorbike, with handles and a pedal; a little house. Each contraption is made out of cardboard and string, and transforms into a digitally augmented toy when you slot Joy-Con controllers and the Switch screen into it. The piano, especially, is quite amazing, and takes about two hours to build. The infrared camera on the Joy-Con controller can see reflective strips of tape on the back of the keys, which come into view when a key is pressed, telling the game software to play the right note. Cardboard dials and switches modify the tone and add effects to the sound.

 

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The finished Toy-Cons are surprisingly sturdy, but won’t stand up to extended enthusiastic play with younger kids. They do, however, dispense with the need to ever spend money on plastic accessories. Nintendo plans to offer replacement cardboard kits and templates for players who break theirs, but the easier solution is just to mend it. You can stick the cardboard Toy-Cons back together with glue or tape, reinforce them, or decorate them with pens, washi tape or googly eyes, without affecting their functionality. It’s easy to imagine creative players and the online maker community taking this customisation in unexpected directions.

 

Nintendo Labo addresses a limitation of existing augmented reality games that use camera technology to superimpose things on the real world: however much you might want to believe that you’re battling monsters, the reality that you’re pointing a phone at a card with a weird pattern on it dents the fantasy. Drawing on Nintendo’s history as a maker of toys, the Nintendo Labo creations are tangible physical objects, enhanced rather than conjured by the games console. It invites players to engage intellectually and creatively with the technology, and the careful process of building them makes for a more mindful toy than most digital entertainment, which will appeal to parents trying to moderate their kids’ screen time.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/games/2018/jan/17/nintendo-labo-cardboard-switch-models-interactive-toys

 

The fishing rod is brilliant. Give us a Bass Fishing port, SEGA (along with the Samba de Amigo port I keep dreaming about).

 

DIY accessories, that are effectively recyclable given the materials, is an brilliant progressive concept following an era of plastic add-ons that end up gathering dust.

 

 

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I love Nintendo. They are ridiculous and insane and just an idea factory.

 

I really think we’d be far worse off without them.

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None of it is for me but I love how eccentric and weird they are. Bayonetta 3 was a month ago. Now this....:notbad:

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Telegraph hands-on:

 

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The first toy we get to play around with is the remote control car. With its pointed ‘legs’ at the front, it looks more like a skittering winged insect as I fold and connect each piece. This is one of the more simple Toy-Cons to build and the instructions are easy to follow, with you scrubbing back and forth on the video to make sure you are on the right track. And in a nice touch, each video will recognise which colour Joy-Cons you are using to help getting them in the right place.

 

I slot a Joy-Con in the ‘wings’ on either side and place the bizarre little thing on the floor. On the touch-screen, I have two buttons to rumble each controller which buzzes the car to life. Press one side and it will turn and judder forward slightly, press both and it is propelled along (at a moderate pace) purely by the vibration of the controllers.

 

It is a pleasing physical trick, but Nintendo are encouraging you to get a bit more creative with some of its other details. You can customise your cardboard toys as you see fit. Here we are asked to turn our cars into Robot Wars-esque battlers in order to take part in a sumo match, red tape stuck to the table to create a ring.

 

I am victorious in the first match against two opponents with their own cars, my now fox-faced and pipe-cleaner attired assassin shoving my foes out with a hastily constructed grabber made of leftover cardboard pointers and some sticky tape. In the second match, the winner topples the rest of us over with a smartly constructed cardboard plough.

 

This exercise demonstrates Nintendo Labo’s clear aim to encourage invention of your own rules as you would with any other physical plaything. There’s plenty of facilitation on Nintendo’s part along the way, of course. The RC car software also uses the right Joy-Con’s infra-red sensor to display a small night-vision display on the Switch. The demonstrator quickly throws together an obstacle course with paper cups and covers it with a box, asking us to locate a hidden Kirby figure using only the camera.

 

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Nintendo seem to be aiming for a mixture of freeform toys and more focussed games. We team up to build the fishing rod, which is a lot more intricate and constructed with real attention to detail. The cardboard pieces slot together to make a fully telescopic rod complete with string and a reel in which the motion-sensing Joy-Con sits. The pièce de résistance with the fishing rod is a tiny piece of cardboard that fits so that, as you turn the reel, it makes a delightful clacking sound like a spoke clicker on a bicycle.

 

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But perhaps the most technically impressive Nintendo Labo Toy-Con we see is saved for last: the piano. In Blue Peter style this is one Nintendo made earlier, as it is one of the most complex and time-consuming builds, but it is quite the thing. The keys are chunky and responsive, with the proper resistance at each press. The Switch sits in the middle, belting out each keystroke you make in perfect time. Run your fingers across the whole board and it rings out a perfect glissando.

 

It is quite boggling how this all works, with just one Joy-Con slotting into the back of the piano. Open up the top and each key has a small infrared sticker on the back, hidden by a stretch of cardboard until you press, kicking the corresponding key up into view of the Joy-Con’s sensor and the correct note playing immediately. There are also dials and levers that use the same method to bend notes or change the tone (to a cat’s mewl, for instance). You can even draw and cut out your own sine graph, slot it into the piano and when you hold down a key, the sensor will ‘read’ the shape and the pitch will undulate accordingly.

 

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If this is the oft-touted Nintendo magic on the surface, the ‘Discover’ section of the Labo software allows you to get into the nitty-gritty of how the Toy-Cons actually work. A team of interactive cartoon characters with names like Lerna Lotte (geddit?), talk you through some of the aspects of how the Toy-Cons use the different aspect of the Switch and what you can do with each toy.

 

In the case of the piano, it shows you what the IR sensor is ‘seeing’ and how the hit-boxes for the keys appear in its vision. This is not an educational tool, but allowing children (and inquisitive grown-ups) to delve into the guts of the bewildering technological engineering that makes Labo work is a brilliant touch.

 

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If there is a doubt that lingers over Labo, it is how long each Toy-Con can hold the attention once the initial wow-factor following its construction has faded. Nintendo has clearly considered this by encouraging further customisation and experimentation, while in the initial reveal there was a glimpse at scores of different Toy-Cons that go beyond the initial packs. Steering wheels, chickens… even at this early stage, the possibilities seem comprehensive to say the least.

 

More below:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gaming/features/nintendo-labo-hands-on-switch-brilliant-barmy-cardboard-toys/

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My kid gets these things called Kiwi Crates every month.  It's similar in that he builds something out of cardboard with it and learns a science lesson. We are down for each and every one of these.

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People complaining about $70 for the variety pack clearly don't have a child in possession of the Robot Wars Haynes Manual, pricing up £500 death machines.

 

I'm going to die.

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