Jump to content
LCVG
Sign in to follow this  
Mark E

“Hey! Listen!” - A 16 game tour of Link’s adventures from Agahnim to Zelda.

Recommended Posts

The best of luck to you, Mark! I’m looking forward to reading your posts on each game. I’m sure I’ll have something to say about them as well, so you have that to look forward to.

 

For what it’s worth, here are my top five Zelda games:

  1. Ocarina of Time
  2. Breath of the Wild
  3. A Link to the Past
  4. Majora’s Mask
  5. Twilight Princess

It’s hard for me to knock down A Link to the Past to the number 3 spot, but BotW was sooooooo good.

 

Do you plan on playing Ocarina of Time and Majora’s Mask on the N64/Virtual Console, or will you be doing the 3DS remakes?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s going to be interesting - I have some real blind spots and a strong affinity for some of the handheld ones (I absolutely love Spirit Tracks despite some seriously poor design decisions).

 

I’ll list the systems as I go too, but most likely the remakes. I played Ocarina in the compilation they released on the Cube ahead of Wind Waker, and finished it, so I don’t mind giving myself a pass on that one.

 

Wind Waker will be the HD version too - I do not mind the sailing around at ALL, but I played the Cube version through at least twice and the port once so it’s had its day ;).

 

I think Majora’s Mask and Link’s Awakening are the only ones I have not experienced on the intended system in any capacity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Suddeny I am reminded that there are still quite a number of Zelda games I have never played.

 

Both this and the RE thread also remind me that I would like to document my inevitable mental breakdown trying to get into Kingdom Hearts. Can’t be sure when that will happen, however. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wind Waker G.O.A.T. 

 

Especially the remaster on the Wii U that fixes the Triforce quest issues at the end of the game. My favorite Zelda by a mile.

 

Plus...

 

 

 

(Skyward Sword also qualifies for proper Beedle interactions.)

 

Skyward on the Switch in HD would be stunning with its pastel like visuals. 

 

Play Majora on the N64 or the Cube compilation. The DS remake makes substantial changes to the game which ruins a lot of the intended gameplay, IMO.

 

Oh and Links Awakening DX on the GBC is lovely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at that list, the only Zelda games I've completed are:

  • The Legend of Zelda
  • A Link to the Past
  • Oracle of Ages
  • Twilight Princess

The only other one I've played for a considerable amount of time was Wind Waker, and the sailing killed that one for me. I just lost interest. 

 

I never played Ocarina (I know!) but I was done with my N64 before it released and I sold the system to get a PlayStation. To this day I really don't care that much, but I keep thinking Nintendo might remaster the game for Switch or something and I will play it then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good luck-I don't remember if I ever finished Spirit Tracks, but I've beaten all of the rest at least once.  I'd say taking some time between games is probably a good idea, since I can see getting burnt out on trying to go through so many games in a short time.  Zelda 1 and 2 are pretty fast-I've done 1 in one sitting before, but that was with someone who knew the game backwards and forwards as a co-pilot. 

 

If you haven't played it, would it be cheating to sub in Master Quest for OOT?  Just to change things up if nothing else.

 

1 hour ago, Romier S said:

Play Majora on the N64 or the Cube compilation. The DS remake makes substantial changes to the game which ruins a lot of the intended gameplay, IMO.

 

Which changes?  I thought having the ability to move time by the hour made a couple of quests (the cows being abducted specifically) much easier to finish, and wasted less time waiting around. Plus, it looks great on the new 3ds with the improved 3d tracking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a fantastic walkthrough of the issues...

 

 

 

It can be argued that these are quality of life improvements that make the game easier and accessible. I’m in far more agreement with the video that it downright breaks and just dumbs down the game in ways that are unnecessary and in points, breaks the design of the original game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mark E said:

Enemies are miserable (the wizzrobes deserve a place in hell) and the dungeons, while excellent, are room after room of punishing combat. I’m no saint, I save scummed the whole way with the Switch’s NES Online, and even then it was by the skin of my teeth in some dungeons. I am not the most reflex oriented gamer, by my own admission, but this felt punishing. The fact that many enemies don’t drop a single item is also fairly cruel.

 

Yeah, the Wizzerobes suck. I remember having a hell of a time trying to get through Level 6 because of them. There's a series of rooms in which you have to fight both the yellow and blue ones while avoiding Like Likes (if I remember correctly), that killed me dozens of times as a kid. Also, the Darknuts in Level 3 were also pretty tough to get past.

 

When I play it now, I usually try to mitigate the challenge by collecting enough hearts to get the White Sword and the Blue Ring as soon as possible. Usually I do this before I even play the Level 1. I'm still likely to die several times throughout the quest, but it is not as bad as it could be. 

 

1 hour ago, Mark E said:

As a kid with hours to sink into the game and friends who I could trade secrets with this would have been something else.

 

Thank god for the internet, is all I can say. Nowadays you can easily find maps of the Overworld for both quests as well as detailed maps of all the dungeons. As a kid, I had Nintendo Power and some friends at school to help figure things out. What we have now is so much better.

 

I do like this game. It's one of my favorite NES titles, but I can totally understand how a newcomer raised on modern games could be put off by it. It's very challenging. You don't get much direction on where to go or what to do. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never played it as a kid, which is weird, so I have no history with it until the Cube era. It’s weird - I played hours and hours of Adventure of Link but not the first one.

 

Zelda 2 is going to be interesting. It’s better, but has its own set of annoyances. Time to chip away at that for a bit...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I abused save states to get through it ;).

 

Not the new ‘all the items and all the money’ version, but the original. I used the d-pad on the Pro controller, which was fine, but I imagine the original Nintendo would have been better for precision’s sake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mega props for having the box, @Starhawk. I also have the cart and the manual, but I was not smart enough to keep the box around. I didn’t wise up in this regard until Ocarina of Time came out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember getting the red candle was a giant boon.  Remember using the blue candle and having to switch screens every time you wanted to test a bush to see if it'll lead to a heart container piece?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/24/2018 at 10:45 PM, Romier S said:

This is a fantastic walkthrough of the issues...

 

 

 

It can be argued that these are quality of life improvements that make the game easier and accessible. I’m in far more agreement with the video that it downright breaks and just dumbs down the game in ways that are unnecessary and in points, breaks the design of the original game.

 

I didn't care one bit about an N64 mini system because I've always thought I can always get these games on 3DS.  Until I saw this.  Now granted, I loved Majora's Mask to death and was able to play on N64 and beat it with all the masks, but my memories of the experience are very hazy at this point.  I have a copy on 3DS, but I have yet to play it.  I don't even know what my experience is going to be like at this point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, JFo said:

Mega props for having the box, @Starhawk. I also have the cart and the manual, but I was not smart enough to keep the box around. I didn’t wise up in this regard until Ocarina of Time came out.

 

Same. I have about 40 physical NES carts. Most with instructions (in varying quality) but I never kept the boxes. More than half of the 35 N64 titles I own are boxed. I smartened up by then thankfully.

 

 

34CD2AB3-362D-4449-A7A8-7A8587A322BA.jpeg

6F67908A-06DF-4D34-9040-25F41BD136DC.jpeg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Mark E said:

This was my first Zelda and I spent a lot of time with it as a kid. I never got too far, but that’s the whole point of this crazy idea. Par for Nintendo’s course of not making sequels like the previous game on the NES, this throws out the top-down perspective except as map travel and the change to side scrolling combat remains a controversial choice.

 

I was also one of those people who played the Zelda 2 before the original.  Strangely enough, I remember one of the original Zelda TV ads turning me off of playing the original in the first place.  Remember the live action one ("octorocks...tektites...leevers!")?  It said something about being "a never-ending adventure", so I assumed that meant that there was no way to complete the game, and it would just be screen after screen of the same stuff that looked like an uprezed C64 game.  In a pre-Nintendo Power world, when the commercial was all you had to go by, this was the problem I suppose.  Anyway, point is that Link was the first Zelda game I bought (and one of the first NES games actually), so I've probably finished it more times than any of the others in the series (Link to the past might be close, and Ocarina just because of the sheer number of re-releases).  It's certainly not a perfect game, but it's at least ambitious.  Once you get the hang of the combat it's not bad, but I do remember grinding a lot in this game.  Pro tip was to skip the early upgrades when you earn the XP near the end of a level, since you auto-level to the next available thing when you finish.  This is how I'd pass up on the second life/magic upgrades to get attack power up really high early in the game.  It's nice to be sitting at 1500 xp, with the next upgrade at 8000, beat a boss, and then see that counter go all the way up! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Mark E said:

I assure you I can recite every part of the Zelda rap verbatim from memory ;).

 

 

 

 

I remember this one as well:

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WARNING: Overly long and highly nostalgic post inbound.

 

Zelda II: The Adventure of Link holds a special place in my heart. It was the first Zelda game I ever played, and it was one of the very first games I got after receiving an NES for my birthday in 1989. When I bought it, my original plan was to get both Zelda games at the same time. I had saved enough money to buy one game on my own, and my parents said they’d buy me a second for having a good report card. Unfortunately, when we arrived at the store, The Legend of Zelda was not in stock. So, I ended up getting with Zelda II along with a little shooter you may have heard of called Contra.

 

Contra was straight forward in terms of what it was and how it played—run to the right, shoot bad guys and don’t get hit by any bullets (easier said than done). I had seen and played games like it before, so I “got” it right away.

 

Zelda II, however, was unlike anything I had ever played. It was big, sprawling, and open-ended. I struggled with it as a result. I didn’t understand many of the clues I was given, and I didn’t yet understand the concept of experience points and leveling up my character.

 

If memory serves, it took me a solid two months of playing during my summer break before I completed it. For at least the first month, I made almost no progress. I couldn’t beat the bosses in the first two dungeons, and more importantly, I could neither cross the river in Saria (the third village) nor could I find the hammer  to break the boulders blocking my path on the overworld map.

 

One day, I was playing the game, not really trying or expecting to find anything, when I stumbled upon a cabin in the forest north of Saria. I ran inside and found a guy named Bagu, who told me to show his note to the river crossing guard. With my heart racing, I ran back to Saria, talked to the guard, and watched with glee as a bridge magically appeared over the gap that had stalled my progress for so long.

 

At this point, I started exploring the caves of Death Mountain. After several attempts, I barely made it through, eventually, making my way to Mido (the fourth town), where finally learned the downward stab. Using this new skill, I made my way back to Death Mountain, and found the thing I had coveted for so long: the hammer! Finally, I could crush all of those damned boulders in my way and get to places I had never seen. At long last, I had made some progress toward my goal of waking Zelda from her eternal sleep.

 

The very next day, I received another great Nintendo surprise. This one came in the mail, however—my very first issue of Nintendo Power! It was issue 6, which featured the first Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles game on the cover. I immediately started pouring through it to see if there were any helpful tips or tricks I could learn. I turned to a section called Counselor’s Corner where they answered common question from readers. One of the pages in this section featured a question regarding Zelda II. “Where do I find the hammer?”

 

Motherfucker.

 

At the very least, this issue did reveal that I could slip through a locked door with the Fairy magic, which came in handy for finishing the 6th palace (see below).

 

I eventually made my way through the rest of the game. It wasn’t easy. There were some secrets I couldn’t find, and when all was said and done, I beat it under the following conditions:

 

  • I did not have the Life spell (couldn’t find the mirror).
  • I did not fully level up Link (Life - 8, Magic - 7, Attack - 6).
  • I did not find the Magic Key in the hidden town of Kasuto (I didn’t know you were supposed to use the Spell magic at the edge of town to raise a temple out of the ground).

 

Having replayed this not too long ago, I’m still impressed I was able to finish it the way I did. This game is hard, even for me now, and I know exactly what I need to do to beat it. Not having the Life spell was a huge disadvantage since there are no other health recovery items other than fairies and the ladies in the towns.

 

I essentially had to chip away at it, bit by bit, to get to the end. Once you collect an item, magic spell, or move, you keep it, regardless of whether you die immediately after. The same goes for bosses. Once they're defeated, they stay dead, and you don't have to repeat the fight. Even better, if you make it to the Great Palace, and you get a game over, you restart the game at its entrance, rather than get sent back to the Princess Zelda's alter at very start of the game. This allowed me to reach the last boss eventually and win the game.

 

I have finished hundreds, maybe even thousands, of games over the years. Many of them are harder and more complex. I don't know if I've ever felt a greater sense of accomplishment than I did after beating Zelda II though.

 

Eventually, I did manage to find all the secrets. I came to understand what leveling up did and why it was helpful. I also learned a good strategy for leveling up throughout the game so that Life, Magic, and Attack were all at level 8 by the time I reached the Great Palace. I also acquired the Life Spell and found the Magic Key. Those items, however, I got by sheer luck, not because a light bulb lit up in my head and I figured out what to do. Still, this is one of the few games where I can say I found everything on my own.

 

Many players look down on Zelda II: The Adventure of Link because it neither copied what came before it nor did it influence any of the Zelda games that followed. That said, it's an excellent action-RPG that has a lot of good systems that are executed very well for its time. There's a lot to like here, and anyone who dismisses the game outright is missing out on one of the NES's best titles.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...