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Videogames in the news - Where smaller stories go to be discussed.


SCREWNUT
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Figured I'd start a thread were we could talk about anything video game related that makes it into the news.

 

First up for me is the C&C:3 game banning 400 live players! check it out!

 

C&C3 Top Players Get Banned for Cheating

Over 75 accounts including 2 in the top 10.

By Philip Kollar' date=' 11/12/2007

 

Nothing ruins a great competitive online game faster than cheaters. Thankfully, our friend and Electronic Arts community manager Aaron "APOC" Kaufman sent along links and a great picture to show that this will not be the fate of Command & Conquer 3.

 

Over 75 accounts were banned in this latest wave, all people with huge numbers of disconnects, many reports of cheating, or just general bad behavior both in and outside of the game. The level of banning varies from suspension, to being kicked from the 1v1 ladders, to a full on permanent ban on playing the game online. Most interestingly, two of the banned players were ranked in the top 10 on the game's ladder system. Full details can be found at the Command & Conquer 3 forums.

 

Kaufman explained the picture and the bans to 1UP: "We're proud of our online gaming community population and are working hard to create as fair an online environment as possible. Cheating and disconnecting is nearly impossible to stop without having multiple processes involved. I wanted to show the community that we take it very seriously, and can also be light-hearted in the same, as a way to make people understand how serious we are."

 

To date, over 400 C&C3 accounts have seen ban and suspension action taken against them.

[img']http://media.1up.com/media?id=3433922[/img]

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Interesting. Why do they keep trying this hook?

 

 

 

Violent video games are teaching tools for aggression: researchers

Last Updated: Wednesday' date=' November 14, 2007 | 2:27 PM ET

CBC News

 

Violent video games teach children aggression by employing the same techniques used by educators, a new study suggests.

 

Father and son research team J. Ronald and Douglas Gentile found that video games share seven parallels with teaching methods, including encouraging players — or students — to learn new skills over a period of time to overcome problems and changing environments. Games, like teachers, are also able to adapt to skill levels and respond to errors.

 

"We know a lot about how to be an effective teacher, and we know a lot about how to use technology to teach," said lead author Douglas Gentile in a release. "Video games use many of these techniques and are highly effective teachers, so we shouldn't be surprised that violent video games can teach aggression."

 

Douglas Gentile is a professor of psychology at Iowa State University. J. Ronald Gentile is a retired educational psychology professor.

 

In their study, which will be published in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Youth and Adolescence, the scientists found that elementary school students who played multiple violent video games were 263 per cent more at risk to become aggressive than those who played only non-violent games.

 

The study looked at the behaviour of 430 elementary school students, 607 middle school students, and 1,441 teenagers who were, on average, 19 years old. As part of the elementary school research, the participating students, along with their peers and teachers, completed surveys assessing aggression and video game play over a six month period.

 

Based on the survey responses, the research found that students who played multiple violent video games were at a 73 per cent higher risk of being highly aggressive than students who played a mix of games. The same multiple violent video game-playing students were rated 263 per cent more at risk than those who played only non-violent games.

 

"We were able to show that students who play multiple violent games actually changed to have a greater hostile attribution bias, which also increased their aggressive behaviors over prior levels," the study said.

 

The researchers said the instructional aspect of video games could be employed positively as a useful educational tool in the future. [/quote']

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I still don't understand this mentality.

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2007/nov/15/socialnetworking.news

 

Police in the Netherlands have arrested a teenager suspected of stealing virtual objects inside a popular social networking site, it has emerged.

 

The 17-year-old, who has not been named, is alleged to have tricked players of 3D cartoon world Habbo Hotel before removing a number of virtual items they had bought. It is believed to be the first time European officers have arrested someone for stealing virtual property.

 

"The accused lured victims into handing over their Habbo passwords by creating fake Habbo websites," said a spokesman for Sulake, the Finnish company that runs Habbo. "As in many other virtual worlds, scamming for other people's personal information such as user names has been problematic for quite a while."

 

The website, which has around 6 million users each month, is popular among teenagers and younger web surfers around the world. Users of the site are able to create and dress characters, or decorate their virtual hotel rooms with items and furniture bought using real money.

 

Police in Amsterdam confirmed that five other teenagers were being questioned over the theft, which is believed to have netted items worth around €4,000 (?2,800).

 

The sale of virtual goods for internet games and online worlds is a boom industry, with the market currently valued at around ?750m a year. Despite the popularity of virtual environments such as World of Warcraft and Second Life, virtual property laws remain untested in most parts of the world.

 

Police in China have been tackling cases of virtual theft for years, including instances of organised gangs engaging in online robbery. Last year officers in the southern city of Shenzhen arrested more than 40 suspects who were accused of stealing up to 700,000 yuan (?45,500) worth of virtual items from users of one popular website, QQ.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Screwnut started a topic in the "Everything Else" are of the forum meant to discussion smaller news headlines that may not have a place in the other threads on the forum and could provide potentially good conversation. I think it's a good concept so let's continue that here. I've moved a good number of the original threads posts here. Feel free to post any relevant news articles and let's keep things on track.

 

Also, it should be noted that the moderation on LCVG will move any pertinent news items that belong in its own game thread over to the proper area of discussion. It's not subject for debate and it's at the moderations discretion as I do not want to see two thread covering the same bases and splitting the conversation.

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Just a heads up regarding a small news piece that i would have posted here but since it's regarding the Kane and Lynch game for the 360, I posted it there instead. Please click on the link below and discuss (In the Kane and Lynch thread that is!!) how you feel regarding the gamespot firing a head reviewer over his rating of this game!

 

Jeff Gerstmann canned for negative Kane & Lynch review?

 

http://www.lcvg.com/forum/showthread.php?p=268382&highlight=kane#post268382

 

Edit: Please note, I only posted this here in this thread, just incase some people don't read the Kane and Lynch thread. Thanks.

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Short (four minute) interview with one Nolan Bushnell on NPR:

 

Am I wrong for seeing Nolan Bushnell as a horrible, horrible representative for the gaming industry? I despise seeing the guy on video game documentaries like the current (and really bad, IMO) "Rise of the Video Game" which I believe is airing on Discovery.

 

Bushnell had a talent for riding the coat tails of truly talented people and really getting a lot out of them. He was also talented at taking credit for things other people did. He was a horrible business person who is rich today simply because of his other strong talent: always looking out for himself.

 

The general media likes to profile Bushnell as the founder of the industry and they look to him like some sort of visionary. When it comes to anything regarding the actual games the man is clueless. Bushnell has zero understanding of today's gaming industry and has no business commenting on it. He gets propped up as an equal to Jobs or Gates despite doing as much to hurt the industry he helped get started as he did to help it.

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Am I wrong for seeing Nolan Bushnell as a horrible, horrible representative for the gaming industry? I despise seeing the guy on video game documentaries like the current (and really bad, IMO) "Rise of the Video Game" which I believe is airing on Discovery.

 

Bushnell had a talent for riding the coat tails of truly talented people and really getting a lot out of them. He was also talented at taking credit for things other people did. He was a horrible business person who is rich today simply because of his other strong talent: always looking out for himself.

 

The general media likes to profile Bushnell as the founder of the industry and they look to him like some sort of visionary. When it comes to anything regarding the actual games the man is clueless. Bushnell has zero understanding of today's gaming industry and has no business commenting on it. He gets propped up as an equal to Jobs or Gates despite doing as much to hurt the industry he helped get started as he did to help it.

 

Fair enough, and very good points that I can't argue with, but who would you choose as an appropriate representative? You're definitely not wrong, I just can't think of anyone who would make more sense. Someone else at Atari?

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Fair enough, and very good points that I can't argue with, but who would you choose as an appropriate representative? You're definitely not wrong, I just can't think of anyone who would make more sense. Someone else at Atari?

 

Why do we need anyone? If anything, Nintendo (particularly Yamauchi & Iwata) should be seen as the visionaries who created the modern video game industry. Bushnell showed us how not to manage the industry and Yamauchi/Iwata saw the mistakes and, despite all odds against them, built the industry we know today. They have the passion Bushnell lacks and are a much more positive story on the whole.

 

Stacked against Iwata is his modesty. He won't be the personality that the media loves in Bushnell -nevermind everything he says is wrong. It's the same problem Ralph Baer has: he just doesn't play well on camera or in print. In the current "Rise of The Video Game" documentary they hardly touched on Nintendo's role after spending a good 30 minutes on Bushnell's glamorous failure. They introduced Miyamoto but didn't explain why his games were different or how they fundamentally improved gaming. The casual viewer will walk away thinking Miyamoto is a foot hill on the mountain range that is Nolan Bushnell. That's just impossible to accept.

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If anything, Nintendo (particularly Yamauchi & Iwata) should be seen as the visionaries who created the modern video game industry.

 

At first I thought maybe there's a language bias, but I wonder if it really comes down to cost/availability. Maybe the Nintendo boys just aren't as available as others -- particularly others located in the continental US.

 

I haven't seen the documentary you mention, but it sounds like it isn't a good one. Does it have any redeeming qualities I should consider?

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I haven't seen the documentary you mention, but it sounds like it isn't a good one. Does it have any redeeming qualities I should consider?

 

The couple reviews I've seen have been good, so perhaps I'm in the minority. However, I would guess those reviews were authored by non-gamers or people too young to remember the period.

 

The documentary attempts to align the "rise of video games" with social and historical events happening in the real world. The point seems to be that gaming is a product of our environment. Ok, that's generally fair of any creative effort but the producers take some minor liberties with the time line which, IMO, comes across like they are reaching. They push this thesis too hard.

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For what it's worth, I've been watching that documentary as well and I agree with Camp, particularly the way it approaches the influence of the NES and the rebirth of the gaming industry here in the U.S. Oh, sure they talk about Super Mario Bros. and The Legend of Zelda and how Miyamoto had a strong influence on game design because of those two titles, but as soon as Sonic the Hedgehog appeared on the Sega Genesis, it was as if Nintendo didn't even exist anymore. It had its little moment in the sun and then just went away once the eighties were over. I'm not exaggerating.

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Slot machines to get makeover, require "skill".

 

http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/12/09/business/slots.php

 

Coming soon are slot machines with joy sticks, which the industry expects to be particularly popular, and others that will allow users to play in tandem or against one another, much like they do in many Internet games.

 

In one effort to appeal to a younger generation of gamblers, Bally Technologies, based in Las Vegas, signed a deal with Atari, the video game pioneer, to develop a series of skill-based slot machines, starting with a Pong-style machine.

 

Interesting article. I guess it never dawned on me that the largest chunk of gambling revenue comes from slots.

 

 

Carlos.

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I guess it never dawned on me that the largest chunk of gambling revenue comes from slots.

 

:lol Have you not been to a casino? Slots require zero skill, and no human interaction to play. They're gigantic moneymakers because they're also among the fastest games to play, and in the gambling world, speed kills. Personally, I hate 'em. Give me a pair of dice or a deck of cards, any day.

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  • 4 weeks later...

And this could never happen over PSN? or Steam? or World of Warcraft? Some stupid child giving out personal information over the Internet is not an Xbox Live problem. Parents should always monitor what their kids are doing on the internet.

Anyone notice the headline mentions Halo3 but the story says the stalker was sending flowers for a year (and the girls parents never asked who was sending these flowers?) - long before Halo3 was released. Facts would just clutter up this great little news snippet.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I saw this over at Kotaku the other day and thought I'd share it with you all. It's basically a snooty bitch from NPR doing a story on how amazing it is that video games have stories and that gamers actually do sometime (gasp) read!

 

Best-Selling Book Shows 'Halo' Game's Wide Appeal

 

Seriously, you all need to listen to this, because this chick is utterly clueless about our hobby and those who enjoy it, it's actually kind of funny... in an enraging sort of way.

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  • 1 month later...

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