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LCVG Coronavirus Temperature Check


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Quick update on my family’s situation. Our youngest boy continues to have a mild fever in the low 99s. He seemed like he was on the upswing late-Thursday and all day Friday. His temp was normal the en

Just a quick update — the test for our older boy came back negative. Of course that just means that he didn’t have it on Friday when he got tested. Considering how much exposure he’s had to his little

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4 hours ago, Angry the Clown said:


Wishing your family all the best and hope it comes back negative. How long will it take to get the result?

Should have the results in two days. She went for the test a couple of hours ago, and they checked her lungs while she was there; her lungs sounded normal, so they don't think she has the virus. So, that's promising.

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3 hours ago, Romier S said:

My company has announced a 4-week furlough for most salaried employees. This includes me. Non-paid but I should be able to recuperate a portion through unemployment so its not the end of the world. We can take it a week at a time too to minimize the pain before the end of the year. 


hopefully you will be able to get that extra 600 when filing for unemployment. Thank god for that on my end It’s helped out a whole lot.

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Seems work has started doing antibody testing to employees. So I should have it done on Thursday when I go in for my one day a week in the office. My mom had the test done today, so we are very interested to see if she did indeed already have it or not.

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TX is opening.  Most businesses and restaurants can open May 1, but must keep capacity to 25% of their normal.  No beauty parlors, just yet, but movie theaters are included.  Masks are recommended when out in public, but not mandatory.  Some county judges had tried to impose fines for not wearing masks, but the governor put a smackdown on that.  No bars or gyms can open.  Museums can open, but all interactive exhibits must remain closed.  

 

We'll see what happens. There will be a really high emphasis on contact tracing, to be ramped up in phases.

 

 

 

Carlos.

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It seems that, for the most part, the country's groupthink has gone from "slow the spread" to "stop the spread".   The latter would require a shutdown lasting longer than our collective psyche can bear. 

 

"Slow the spread" was meant to prevent hospitals and medical resources from being overwhelmed. 

 

"Stop the spread" is like setting the speed limit to 20 MPH, and putting rev limiters in all cars, to prevent traffic fatalities, while the politicians placing that law into effect zoom around in helicopters.

 

We economize with our lives all the time. 

 

 

Carlos.

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6 hours ago, rustyjaw said:

And I think that’s the basic point of so many epidemiologists; we still don’t know what we’re dealing with. We don’t know how many people have it, we don’t know if it’s truly airborne, we don’t even know what form post-exposure immunity takes, or how many people will benefit. 

 

It really is unprecedented, and beyond not knowing how it spreads, we're still figuring out new symptoms.  First it was asymptomatic carriers, and now they suspect that it could be causing blood clots leading to strokes in people with mild symptoms.  We also don't know whether that's a result of direct infection, or a long term effect.  There are also reports coming out that even after recovery, the virus could affect lung capacity longer term. This could be why the conversation shifted from slowing the infection and letting it burn through the population slowly to trying to eradicate it as much as possible. 

 

They've extended the school closures to at least May 31 here, but are talking about reopening some businesses/services in May, but without any concrete dates yet.  Also had a couple of the kids' summer camps cancelled already, and expecting more of those to come, since really, large-ish hubs like that are the perfect places to get outbreaks.  Working from home is still going fine, and I find I'm getting more focus time than I would have at the office by far, and still glad to be gainfully employed through this.  I'm fine staying here for longer if it means that others who can't work remotely can get back to their jobs.

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6 hours ago, rustyjaw said:

Because information is what we lack most right now, every public health decision is like a hypothesis being tested. I think if Texas can really get on contact tracing and keep up with it, that will surely help. I hope it goes better than anyone predicts, because it could help us all find a way out.

 

I have mixed thoughts. Human beings can use "just to be safe" to justify literally any action. And do so irrationally. At the extreme I might speculate that there is a chance that you, rustyjaw, might be a serial killer. Therefore, just to be safe, I'm going to kill you today.

 

I've had friends say that they believe in vaccines, but just to be safe, they're going to delay their child's vaccine or break them up, or whatever.

 

There are always opportunity costs with applying "just to be safe" as justification for actions that have other negative consequences that are less emphasized, sensational, or visible. So I am leery of people's use of the "just to be safe" mentality as an overriding justification for action.

 

That being said, if we are only at 15% immunity, assuming there is long term immunity, "opening up" has to re-kindle the exponential transmission that put us in lock-down in the first place. Friggin viruses.

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HEB is mostly done with rationing, outside of paper goods from what I can tell. Everything else has been pretty well stocked the last week at least. 

While we've been rationing toilet paper, milk, eggs, sanitizer etc, this is what a mate back home near Glasgow spotted yesterday: 

6h75iMK.png

 

Never change, Scotland. ;) 

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I think that there is an interesting thread of discussion embedded in the essential workers social concerns and appreciation.

 

Given the danger to essential workers, and given the fact that their work is deemed "essential," I'd say that this plays into the technological automation discussion in an interesting way. 

 

Automating essential functions, thus eliminating the "workers" component of "essential workers" would A ) Remove people from danger and B ) maintain these essential functions. I'd say that this whole closed down human worker economy thing will be significantly mitigated by further automation in all of these sectors.

 

Amazon warehouses. Grocery Stores. Food trucks. Bus drivers. Even nurses doing basic diagnosis and triage. The more automation the better in this situation for all of these things.

 

This doesn't erase the challenge of providing work for low-skilled workers in a "normal-non-pandemic" economy. But it certainly should be a consideration. Do we really want to depend on human beings doing these essential things if that dependence becomes a huge liability like it has become?

 

The last thing I would mention on automation generally is that the more we automate jobs, the cheaper things should and have become. In an imaginary world where buses are autonomous and they run on solar electric, the government might provide that transportation for free. Sure we're eliminating grocery store jobs,and food transportation jobs,  but food prices go down as we automate. Less income, but lower cost of living.

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