Jump to content
LCVG

Unreal Engine 5 unveiled running on PlayStation 5...


Romier S
 Share

Recommended Posts

UE5 is designed for existing and next-gen platforms.

 

Quote

Unreal Engine 5 will be available in preview in early 2021, and in full release late in 2021, supporting next-generation consoles, current-generation consoles, PC, Mac, iOS, and Android.

 

We’re designing for forward compatibility, so you can get started with next-gen development now in UE4 and move your projects to UE5 when ready. 

 

 

https://www.unrealengine.com/en-US/blog/a-first-look-at-unreal-engine-5

 

But, yes, obviously there will be more advance features to take advantage of for next gen development and hardware. 

 

The Digital Foundry analysis Romier posted above is well worth a watch.

 

 

Also, these were the EU4 tech demos that Epic created in house from 2012 and 2013 respectively:

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, rustyjaw said:

But it makes me wonder if the base price for (AAA) games will be $70, possibly more. I know that's a cynical thing to jump to, but is it fair to think that?

 

 I doubt it.  More trying to add things on, sure, but that's business.  If anything, this seems like a way to make things easier-the impression I got was that you would have a case where you create a high-poly model and high res textures, and then have to create several lower resolution versions for lower end systems, higher density/draw distance etc, meaning that for a given object, you might have what-8 or 9 versions of something?  The implication here seems to be that the engine can handle the scaling, which if that's the case could mean a whole lot less effort in the asset pipeline.  Unless there's something else in the tech that I was missing-still need to check out that DF video...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Even before the impending recession I would have thought it hard to realistically push beyond the prices we already pay for games. I think a number of publishers will simply continue to inflate the existing price of games with pre-order bonuses, DLC, expansions and micro-transactions ("oh, Ubisoft"). 

 

 

Also (somewhat related) via the web link I shared above, they are now waving royalties on Unreal Engine up to the first $1m in revenue.

 

Quote

Starting today, you can download and use Unreal Engine to build games for free as you always have, except now royalties are waived on your first $1 million in gross revenue. The new Unreal Engine license terms, which are retroactive to January 1, 2020, give game developers an unprecedented advantage over other engine license models. For more information, visit the FAQ.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is interesting that we paid $60 for Super Nintendo Games in 1991 and $60 today for current-gen games. And how much higher is the cost to develop these days? Add on to that $60 in 1991 adjusts to $115. Are we getting relatively cheap games due to the number of copies sold? I don't understand the economics of it. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Skip to nine minutes for Keighley's interview with the Unreal team. Its' really interesting stuff.

 

 

key highlights:

 

  • Demo was fully playable real time footage (they plugged a recorder into their PS5 dev kit and captured the output over HDMI) and the engine generates a variety of differences every time you play it.

 

  • Demo shown was purely a tech demo, not a game in development.

 

  • Tim Sweeney talks about how UE5 is designed to make development more economical and to generally make development easier, potentially requiring much smaller development teams.

 

  • Sweeney gushes about the PS5 SSD. Seems to genuinely believe that pop in and level loading tricks will be a thing of the past (the demo has the character squeezing between a crack in a wall however, the typical level loading trick we're all used to, so I'm not sure if that was for loading or they just threw it into the gameplay for the sake of familiarity. You'd think they'd avoid it to demonstrate such things are no longer relevant though? 🤷‍♂️ Sadly Keighley does not quiz them on this).

 

  • It's a scaleable engine designed for everything from current gen, iOS, android, next-gen and PC platforms. They talk about how the intention is to make it easy to develop a title for maximum fidelity, but be able to bring it down the chain to less powerful devices (clearly value there for the "Xbox family" and the cross-gen approach MS seem keen to pursue with game availability?). They basically want the engine to allow any game to be able to reach as many devices as possible just like Fortnite can, should a developer/publisher so desire.

 

  • The Lumen and Nanite technology allow unprecedented levels of rich dynamic environments which will have benefits for everything from destructible environments to a much more seamless integration of user generated content than we've been used to.

 

  • They talk about how Nanite enables cross-media use of the same visual assets, from movie/tv production to gaming. Regardless of an asset's destination, a videogame can drop in something designed for a movie production without any manipulation required to implement it into the gaming environment. "You pick a higher resolution asset you want, you load it in and you don't have to think about levels of detail, normal maps or any of the usual stuff that goes into making game content." They go on to give an example of Quixel's library of megascans, who traditionally offer separate files for a single asset for gaming, and a separate file for film/tv production use. The former would no longer be relevant under UE5. 

 

  • Engine is designed to make transition from initial development under EU4 to EU5 seamless for dev teams. They will be working on transitioning several in house games, Fortnite most notably, to demonstrate this and test with in the year ahead (according to Eurogamer, Sweeney has told Richard from Digital Foundry that we can expect to see Fortnite migrate to EU5 in mid-2021).

 

  • The bulk of the work on the demo, developed by about two dozen people (and using Quixel megascan assets), was thrown together over the course of around six months, starting last September.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Angry the Clown said:

Skip to nine minutes for Keighley's interview with the Unreal team. Its' really interesting stuff.

 

I had this going in the background when it was live and I was surprised they went the whole hour.

 

Also, Epic is very local to me so I'm always glad to see them kick ass. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Id_Tech_6#cite_note-E3_2008-5

 



 "E3 2008: The John Carmack Interview. Rage, id Tech 6, Doom 4 Details, and More!". Maximum PC. 2008-07-15. I still think there’s one more generation to be had where we virtualize geometry with id Tech 6 and do some things that are truly revolutionary. (...) I know we can deliver a next-gen kick, if we can virtualize the geometry like we virtualized the textures; we can do things that no one’s ever seen in games before.

 

Took more than a decade :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Starhawk said:

It is interesting that we paid $60 for Super Nintendo Games in 1991 and $60 today for current-gen games. And how much higher is the cost to develop these days? Add on to that $60 in 1991 adjusts to $115. Are we getting relatively cheap games due to the number of copies sold? I don't understand the economics of it. 

I think if you’d take into account the production cost of a cartridge compared to disc or digital download that the profit margin is still probably higher on the latter over the former. Even with inflation. Market is also much bigger now meaning many more possible sales. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The lighting aspect of UE5 excites me tremendously. We know ray tracing is going to be both expensive from a development perspective and somewhat limited on next gen hardware, but it’s good to know it need not be the be all and end all for delivering next gen real time lighting effects that we simply haven’t seen before. This kind of real time lighting alone in a survival horror game will be a real treat.

 

It’s going to be fascinating to see what first party engines have to offer next gen by comparison.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Eldorado said:

I think if you’d take into account the production cost of a cartridge compared to disc or digital download that the profit margin is still probably higher on the latter over the former. Even with inflation. Market is also much bigger now meaning many more possible sales. 

 

Yeah one of the benefits I remember of PS1 games was the lower price. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Eldorado said:

I think if you’d take into account the production cost of a cartridge compared to disc or digital download that the profit margin is still probably higher on the latter over the former. Even with inflation. Market is also much bigger now meaning many more possible sales. 


The shelf life of a game is much longer now too thanks to backwards compatibility and digital stores. Games aren’t fading away with each generational transition quite like they used to, so sales can continue far longer over time. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...