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Disney and Pixar go their separate ways.


Romier S
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Heres the report on Fox News:

 

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,109874,00.html

 

"After 10 months of trying to strike a deal with Disney, we're moving on," Jobs said in a prepared statement. "We've had a great run together -- one of the most successful in Hollywood history-- and it's a shame that Disney won't be participating in Pixar's future successes."

 

The story also appears on Wired:

 

http://www.wired.com/news/business/0,1367,...tw=wn_tophead_5

 

With thier 2D animation studios thrown to the wind and now there biggest box office money making studio giving them the wave goodbye I think its about time Disney (ie Eisner) wake the hell up and smell the roses.

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Originally posted by exile@Jan 29 2004, 07:47 PM

As I've said elsewhere I suspect they will either go alone or talk to another studio.. I'm thinking Dreamworks which would be a perfect fit.

Dreamworks already has a CGI studio at its side, PDI which brought us Antz and Shrek. I suppose they could have two CGI studios, but it wouldn't seem very productive since the two studios are competitors. I could be wrong though.

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I'm of two minds about this. I am glad it's happened because Pixar deserve a better deal, but the company always acknowledged they'd have loved to stay with Disney had the deal been renegotiated on terms all could agree upon. If Disney shareholders still wish to keep Eisner now that his stubbornness has lost the company Pixar and the Henson Company, it will be a gargantuan display of ignorance on their part.

 

 

I'm thinking Dreamworks which would be a perfect fit.

 

As J-Fo noted, Dreamworks now own a good slice of PDI. They may not wish to sour their relationship with them, although I believe the studio does actually have their own 100% in house CGI animated film in production alongside current Dreamworks/PDI projects as well, so who knows.

 

I'd like to see a partnership with Warner Bros. They're a good studio, but one that needs a better grip on its family output. Terrific DVDs too. :)

 

Daniel

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Eisner is going to have a rude awakening when kids (and adults) still flock to the new Pixar movies and ignore the stuff Disney releases. After a few flops, I see them quickly trying to jump start their 2D works, only to find all the good artists telling them to go to - well, you know.

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Great, maybe now those Disney bastards will release Alladin on DVD finally...

 

This year Snake (I believe Aladdin is the next platinum selection). Also lets lighten up on the bastard speak. Eisner is in danger (or hell may have already surpassed) the bastard label ;) but Disney can still be steered in the right direction. Thier release schedule (and subsequent moratorium of titles) has unfortunately been in place longer than DVD.

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Under Pixar's current deal with Disney, the companies share box office receipts and licensing revenues while Disney retains the right to make sequels to movies such as Toy Story and Monsters Inc.

 

I sudder to think what Disney may try to do with Pixar's babies to make a quick buck.

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Originally posted by adamsappel@Jan 30 2004, 01:35 PM

Those cheap-ass direct-to-video sequels that Disney has been churning out are going to poison the well far more than any of their uninspired original content.

Thank you, I was just thinking about that last night as I walked by an ad for "Lion King 1 1/2" -- which comes awfully close to sounding like half a movie...direct to DVD.

 

Disney has a great name, and a fantastic history, they just need to catch up with the rest of the world. They need to take some chances.

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I don't know about that...Disney knows their market pretty well at this point. Sure, you and I know that "Return of Jafar" is crap compared to Alladin, but my 5-year-old niece and nephew sure don't. All my niece knows is that she loved The Little Mermaid, so when she saw "Return to the Sea" in the grocery store, she squealed until her mother bought it for her. And my nephew loved Buzz Lightyear from the Toy Story movies, so his parents bought him that Buzz Lightyear knock-off sequel a few years back. Did they enjoy the sequels as much as the originals? Yeah, actually they probably did...what do they know? They're just dumb kids. (:)) It's not hard to make a cartoon that appeals to a five year old, especially when you are starting with familiar (and beloved) characters.

 

Plus I'm sure those sequels are dirt cheap to make. I imagine Disney does very well pumping them out, despite our (meaning adults) distaste for them.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I can't help but think that both Pixar and Disney are going to be in for a little bit of a shock. Together, the synergy of Disney's marketing might and Pixar's wondrous animation produced one of the most successful run of film collaborations of all time.

 

Without Pixar, Disney will still be a marketing beast but without the Pixar crutch to stand on. Their own internal animation efforts recently have been flops. A successful Disney movie not only brings in the cash at the box office but also untold other opportunities for selling related merchandise at their theme parks and stores, McDonald's, etc. Will Disney survive without Pixar? Of course. As PoisonJam said, while the Disney name may no longer signify quality animated films for discerning adults, children are still a captive audience. Where they will lose out will be in the adults who may not be drawn into the non-Pixar films which may not play to as wide a range of movie-goers as the Pixar films do. Disney will need to resurrect its internal animation department again (much as they did during the Little Mermaid/Aladdin/Beauty and the Beast/Lion King period) and get back to what made them a household name in the first place-- quality animation for the whole family, not feature-length toy commercials.

 

Without Disney, Pixar will still be able to produce incredible animation with great stories and characters. But even if they team up with another large experienced media corporation like Time Warner, will their merchandise reach as many outlets? Disney has the theme parks, the retail stores, the cable channels, the tie-ins with McDonald's, etc. that few, if any, corporations do. Will Pixar survive without Disney? Of course. They are much too talented with a proven track record and brand recognition to fail at this point unless they stop doing what got them to this point-- produce smart, funny animated films for all ages.

 

It's really sad that Eisner and Jobs couldn't see past their egos to see the golden goose that they had working together.

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