Jump to content
LCVG

New EGM article online.


Romier S
 Share

Recommended Posts

Fascinating article. There's some interesting stuff hidden amongst the corporate speak, but it's far more truthful than most of these "interviews" tend to be. And as frank as a company exec will ever likely get.

 

We can't do enough games ourselves to fill up the entire calendar year, but there are also certain types of games we aren't really good at

 

That they admit this is rather interesting too, but at least Nintendo isn't as blind as some people would make them out to be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found this quote interesting:

 

I think that, clearly, the improvement in graphics and presentation by the systems is reaching diminishing returns. We've talked about this before, but the reason for a consumer to buy the next generation of hardware, for many of the competitors, is not going to be because the graphics are prettier. It'll ultimately come back to what is a unique gaming experience. Again, with the introduction of Pokemon to the Game Boy, we took that business from selling 3.5 million hardware units a year to 9 million or more. So, it's that ability to generate unique gameplay that stimulates the whole market, and there's going to be a real surge on that.

 

I really hope that he's right, but this is not the way things are actually going. More of the same continues to sell.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm an admitted graphics whore so hearing the big N wax on about how consumers don't want the pretty graphics is kind of depressing. When multiplatform games hit I always buy the XBox versions because they usually have 5.1 sound and if I'm real lucky 720p support... these kind of things should be in all the next gen systems I pray.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I actually agree with Nintendo on this one. Let's face it, the jump from 16 bit to 32/64 bit consoles was a huge jump in terms of graphics. It took games into the 3rd dimension, which just created so many more kinds of games. This generation we jumped up to 128 bit consoles and the jump wasn't as big. Games looked/sounded prettier, but it wasn't nearly the gameplay jump like we had before. Going from this generation to the next one(256 bit consoles?) will be even smaller. Graphics and sound will certainly look improved, but not by a vast amount. I'm willing to bet that the next gen machines are equally powerful that it will be next to impossible to tell which system a multiplatform game is being played on as they will probably all look exactly the same. If that's the case and all the next gen systems are able to pump very similar things in terms of video and audio, then the system that has the better content will be the one that gamers tend to gravitate towards. Nintendo is counting on the fact that gamers will buy their console over the competition next generation because of their first/second party titles along with having the same great 3rd party games that the other consoles have. I like the fact that Nintendo is really trying to focus more on making great games rather than great looking games.

 

I personally think the key for Nintendo next generation is online gaming. I think if Nintendo can start that up and make it work well, then they'll be a strong player next generation. Who wouldn't want to play some Mario Kart or Smash Brothers online while trash talking. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to reply to this cuz.... well I have worked with or known many Nintendo fanboys/girls and have managed to keep my sanity intact mostly. For the most part, these individuals are the posterchildren of the Gamecube community. Fiercely loyal, buys most if not all first party titles no matter how crappy they are, defends the image of the big N til the death, and they do not care two shits about online play. Yep, its true. I think the average Gamecube owner does not care whether their console is online or not. ALL the people I know that own a GC have no intentions of using "Warp Pipe" or hooking their precious game box up to the internet.

 

I also do not think the Big N has any intentions of making the next console internet ready out of the box. They still think its a risky venture - and it is. Frankly I'm kind of with them. Keep the PC gaming out of my consoles and console gaming out of my PC.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kitty there is one thing though. If you do not want to play online with a console you dont have to . Thats why Sony and Microsoft sell there internet products seperatly (except for the xbox modem). Nintendo even sells a broadband adapater for one game. The warp pipe is out there but to tell ya the truth for most people it does not work. Ruffneck and I have tried many times and it just does not work for some reason. Though many do not want to play online. There are many who do want to do Mario Kat online and many other games. Dont you think they should give the gamer a choice like Microsoft and sony are doing?

 

capt

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would have to say that the online option is becoming an important part of the gaming experience these days. I was a hardcore proponent of no multiplayer for a looooong time. I always swore that I would never pay monthly fee to play a game, then I discovered MMORPG's (specifically DAoC, Earth & Beyond, and Asheron's Call 2) and got hooked. I now only have one active, but online gaming has become a major thing to me as a gamer.

 

Now that I have the same choices with my consoles I think that atleast having the option is an important thing. X-Box Live makes my X-Box that much better an investment for me. With that in mind, I know that not all gamers consider online play a major, or even minor thing, but I think that having the option available is an important thing.

 

That being said, I am glad that Nintendo is indicating that they are going to have a concentration on the quality games going forward beyond the superficial. I admit, that pretty graphics make me drool just like everyone else, but all the pretty graphics in the world can't save a game that just flat out isn't fun. I have played plenty of pretty games that were just not fun, but I have played plenty that graphically were unimpressive, but sucked me in despite that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

While online gaming isn't a big part of Nintendo's focus with the Gamecube(yet anyway), I'm willing to bet that it will play a huge role with the Gamecube's successor(N5?). Nintendo oftentimes likes to study something and mess with it and tweak it before launching it so that it can meet their quality standards. There's a good chance that Nintendo is already messing with their online service as we speak and are probably getting it ready for the launch of their next console. Nintendo isn't a dumb company and they know that online gaming is here to stay. I'm sure they're just trying to do some interesting and unique things with it. While it would've been nice to have online gaming with the GC(especially since it even has ports to accomodate it), I can wait a little while longer for it. I still game online with my PS2 and eventually I'm sure I'll sign up for XBOX Live. I do know that once Nintendo goes full steam ahead with online gaming, I know they will do it good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, for instance, Nintendo wasn't the first to introduce games in 3d. PC games have been in 3d long before console games. However, I'm sure Nintendo studied it and refined it so that console games also translated well in 3d.

 

Wireless controllers have exhisted before the wavebird, but I personally think the wavebird is the best one on the market today(and it's Nintendo's first attempt at wireless controllers).

 

Also, the analog stick was first introduced with the Sega Saturn, but Nintendo seemed to refine it and make it a much more integral part of gaming when the N64 came out.

 

Nintendo had actually messed a little with online gaming in Japan with the SNES. I'm sure that they studied Sega's strategy with the DC and are now studying MS and Sony. I just think that there's a good chance that if/when Nintendo gets more focused into online gaming, that they won't go into it half assed. Chances are they will come out of the gate and have something extremely well put together.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

console games also translated well in 3d.

 

I don't want to divert from this interesting bit of discourse, but I have to say that I believe that people acclimate to 3D rather than actually play a product that feels natural and well done in 3D.

 

Even OoT is less intuitive than people make it out to be. But that could just be my stubborn-ass opinion too ;).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

However, I'm sure Nintendo studied it and refined it so that console games also translated well in 3d.

 

That's the biggest piece of console history revisionism I've read in a long while. There were tons of quality 3D console games before Nintendo released the N64... Perhaps you meant 3D platformer?

 

And the analogue stick was first introduced, and made mainstream, with the good old Atari 2600 etc. It's Nintendo who made it go out of fashion with the NES...

 

But thanks for the other pointers, Danger, that's the detail I wanted to know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yikes dogbert,

 

I'm sorry if I upset you in some way. I felt I made some valid points. I think Nintendo is an innovative company and at the same time if they're not innovative in the sense that they release a product first, Nintendo tends to at least release a quality product.

 

Now, I confess to being a Nintendo fan. However, my experiences with Nintendo(past and present) have all been very positive. I've been very happy with past and present Nintendo hardware and software. I have no doubts in my mind that should Nintendo decide to create some type of online system that it will be a well done system.

 

You are certainly right in that analog control exhisted before Nintendo. The D-pad had become the preferential way to play games in the 80's and 90's, however, Sega first and later Nintendo brought back the analog control concept later on and made it popular again by making games that took good use of the analog controls.

 

3d games definitely exhisted on consoles before the N64. However, again, I was just trying to say was that it was the 32 bit/64 bit consoles that really made 3d games become the new standard for console games. Heck, I remember games like Starfox and Pilotwings on the SNES that were basically 3d games. Nevertheless, I never said that Nintendo pioneered 3d gaming on consoles, just that they took what exhisted before and refined things and released a quality product.

 

Again, I'm sorry if I said something to upset you. I'm certainly not trying to start a war up or anything. I guess I just wanted to post to this thread to give my 2 cents about Nintendo. I think they're a good company that releases quality products. I truly believe that online gaming will be their next big venture and after having such positiv experiences with their past and present products I am really looking forward to their future ones. I know some people here are very concerned that Nintendo has lost their way and that they no longer release a quality product. This post was an attempt to help alleviate people's fears because I feel that Nintendo won't let all of it's fans down.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nintendo interviews frustrate the hell outa me. They keep claiming that they've learned their lessons, but I'm not so sure that they have.

 

"You know what? I really want to play Zelda: The Wind Waker, but I already own another system." We see people buying it for $99 as a second system; potentially someone who has owned a PlayStation 2 for three years already and know that they have another two or so years to wait. They're saying "I can open myself up to another library of exclusive games here with GameCube."

 

Great! The Gamecube DOES make a great SECOND system. And yes there are some great exclusive NINTENDO exclusives (and a few from Capcom and Sega).

 

But yet you're having troubles keeping your 3rd parties happy, and this is what a good chunk of the interview focuses on. If Nintendo thinks they can entice 3rd parties simply by a slightly larger install base of the system and great sales from Zelda and Mario Kart, I'd say they're in for a surprise.

 

The biggest problem I see for them and showing 3rd parties that their system is the one to develop for is that, as a great 2nd system, there's usually no reason to buy the multiplatform games on the GC, and I know we've discussed this here before, since the other two almost always seem to have an edge in some way (better graphics and sound on XBox, online play on PS2, and the controler on GC seems to hinder more than it helps).

 

We've seen with Soul Calibur, that the Gamecube software can perform well when there is a reason for us multiplatform guys to choose it over the others... and THAT will show 3rd parties that the GC is a viable system, because heaven (and EA) knows it's far too risky to make many exclusives for it.

 

But it doesn't happen enough. I don't own a single multiplatform game for my GC (Well, I have a copy of NHL2003 which doesn't count since I got it for free). That's licensining cash that's going to Microsoft. That's yet another sale showing up in the XBox column. That could be going to Nintendo, but I see no reason for it to in most cases.

 

And I'm sorry to inform Nintendo that I don't think Gameboy connectivity is going to get them where they need to be. They need to be negotiating more incentives like Link appearing in SC2.

 

And in some cases I think it could be something as simple as an exclusive feature (excluding connectivity, since it should be something we can all use), or freebie like PacMan VS or classic NES or SNES games packaged with remakes. This is low risk for the publisher, they may get some help from Nintendo on the program even, and everybody wins.... except for Sony and MS.

 

Back in the 16-bit war there was usually a reason to buy SNES titles over Genesis, and when the Genesis got an edge on some exclusive (Say... Mortal Kombat), something was done about it.

 

Now, it seems that Nintendo is lost. Publishers are not just skipping GC for exclusives, but skipping the system all together (Baldurs Gate: DA2 springs to mind, as well as Sega pulling it's sports support last year). They need to get back in the game and make their system not just a great 2nd system with terriffic exclusive Nintendo titles, but THE choice for the games that are coming out on all 3 systems.

 

However, I honestly think they can't recover this round.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Baldurs Gate: DA2 springs to mind

 

To be fair though, the 3rd party thing works both ways. I played BG:DA on the PS2 and it was a great little game which I would have been happy to pick up on the Cube since, you know, I don't have any other consoles.

 

But the port was so shoddy that it was riddled with slowdown and generally deemed inferior. Well, the Cube hardware is definitely more powerful than the PS2's, so what's the deal? Crappy third party support from the third party company, which makes their product unpalatable to the consumer. I'm not paying for a lousy conversion just to show support for companies making Cube titles.

 

And then you have companies who release late for the Cube after other systems and then moan that it doesn't sell. Well, even if you had a choice and wanted to play a title, you'd get it for what was available.

 

Don't get me wrong, I think you make excellent points, and I barely have any third-party non-exclusive titles myself, except for SSX Tricky and BG&E, but we have to realize that while Nintendo should shoulder most of the blame, they aren't the only ones who are contributing to the problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nintendo oftentimes likes to study something and mess with it and tweak it before launching it so that it can meet their quality standards.

 

While I have no doubts that Nintendo is studying other companies online strategies, I still say the getting an online system going is a completely different ballgame than developing a Wireless or Analog gamepad. I still think they just may be left struggling to catch up yet again in the next round of consoles if they do decide to get into the online gaming biz.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree that Nintendo had/has problems with 3rd party companies. I agree with Pharmboy though in that the fault isn't all Nintendo's. I get tired of seeing multiplatform games get released several months later than the other console versions and that the GC version is a sloppy port. Then when the games don't sell well on the GC the developers think that it's because there is no audience for that type of game on the GC rather than because the game was a crappy port that got released after the other versions. This is an unfortunate trend that many 3rd party companies have gotten into with the GC.

 

While Nintendo definitely needs to work harder at making 3rd party companies happy, I think they are making a good start by collaberating on titles. Sega and F-Zero, Silicon Knights and Metal Gear Solid, Namco and Starfox, etc. are what will hopefully be the beginnings of some strong relationships Nintendo is building with 3rd parties. I'd really like to see Nintendo work hard at building some stronger relationships with US and UK developers as well.

 

While there's no way for Nintendo to catch up this generation, hopefully Nintendo can make things right starting next generation. I guess it all depends on what they have going. Hopefully they'll have a strong launch software lineup with a good robust hardware that not only offers the great visuals/audio of it's competitors, but hopefully Nintendo will have a strong online presence as well. I think if their hardware is comparable to that of Sony and MS, and they have a good online setup, and Nintendo has some strong launch software, there's no reason they can't come out on top next generation.

 

DrunkOM, you're right that making a good online service is a heck of a lot different than making a wireless controller. However, since Nintendo has dabbled with online stuff in the past, I'm hoping that they'll have enough familiarity with it to make a strong presence in it. Heck, I think one thing Nintendo could do just to help get people to use their service is to offer all those old classic NES/SNES games for download so that they can be played on the Gamecube 2/ N5. Nonetheless, this is just me speculating. I'd really like to see Nintendo make a strong online presence next gen because I think they have numerous games that would translate very well online(Mario Kart, Smash Brothers, Animal Crossing, etc.). I guess we'll find out more by E3 2005 when Nintendo will talk about their next console.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I actually have 20 multi-platform titles on the GameCube, but admittedly most of these were purchased for a vacation where I would be providing the gaming goodness and the GC was the most travel-friendly. Sometimes the GC's late ports feature gameplay improvements (Dead to Rights, Conflict Desert Storm, Transworld Surf:Next Wave). Since PS3, Xbox Next and N5 will most likely be essentially equal in graphics, something else will have to tip the scales. I think that if Nintendo commits to online support for all their multi-player first-party games in the next generation (perhaps even backwards-compatibility with GC's LAN games), that will sell enough systems to keep them in contention.

 

I ordered Def Jam Vendetta yesterday ($10 with EA coupon) and was surprised to see that it was not available for Xbox. Anyone know why? It seems a natural fit with Xbox's core audience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And the analogue stick was first introduced, and made mainstream, with the good old Atari 2600 etc. It's Nintendo who made it go out of fashion with the NES...

 

Wasn't the Atari controller just a "digital" joystick. I always thought that an analog stick gave you the ability to vary the signal based on how far you pushed the stick in a particular direction. Did the N64 analog stick function in this way??

 

 

I could be wrong. But either way, I'm probably splitting hairs.

 

J.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did I say 2600? I meant the next one up, the 5200 :) Yup, the "classic" Atari stick is digital, but that's not the one I meant.

 

Good Atari Times article on early Atari sticks with pictures.

 

Did the N64 analog stick function in this way??

 

The N64 stick, along with the Saturn & PS2 controllers, are true analogue devices with a range of return (usually -128 to 128, but that's irrelevant). Their biggest problem is range of motion, with the PS "sticks" in particular usually being used with three bands in practice - at rest, medium & extreme - as it's extremely hard on the player to expect more precise motion with the range of the sticks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...