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Tekken 5


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Saw the trailer. Looks better but generally more of the same. Most notable stuff is that they brought the Jack robots back, killed off Heihachi Mishima (I guess they got the hint regarding his unpopular appearance in SoulCalibur II), and added three new characters: Feng Wei (non-descript monk-looking guy with scars), Asuka Kazama (female fighter, kind looks like Jun Kazama), and Raven (imagine DOA's Zack if he didn't suck).

 

They seemed to put the most concentration in the graphics engine, which doesn't come across well in the trailer.

 

Returning characters from the trailer: Kazuya, Jin, Hwoarang, Yoshimitsu, Bryan Fury, Christie Montiero, Craig Marduk, Steve Fox, Paul "Cheap" Phoenix, Gun Jack (or Jack-2 or Jack-whatever), Marshall Law, Nina, Ling Xiaoyu, King, Lee Chaolan, Julia Chang, Kuma (ugh).

 

Didn't see Lei Wulong, Eddy Gordo or Combot/Mokujin in the trailer.

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  • 9 months later...

I'm thinking of picking this up next week. Still not sure if I'm going too since I haven't really enjoyed a Tekken game since Tekken 2 but I'd like to revisit the series. Tekken 5 does seem to have a boatload of game modes as well as a substantial list of fighters. That fact along with the inclusion of arcade perfect versions of Tekken 1, 2 and 3 are pushing this into the "buy" category. EB is also offering a free artbook with a preorder.

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Does anyone know how limited the limited-edition bundle with the Hori stick is going to be for this? I'm kinda tempted to get it for the stick, but shipping is evil, so it will have to wait until I'm next in the US.

 

Unless they announce the bundle for the UK as well. At which point they'll all be stolen by low-flying pigs, but never mind.

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I played some Tekken 5 at an arcade.

 

Not our arcade, that is a Barnes and Noble now.

Not the arcade in the other city here in the tri-cities, no Tekken 5 there.

 

But we were on a trip to Ann Arbor and went to Pinball Pete's. I saw the Tekken 5 machine and people playing, and had to try it.

 

Now I didn't like Tekken 4 much at all. Can't really say why. But Tekken 3 was cool, and Tekken Tag Tournament was the game of choice with me and my friend (who is now gone to CA, no one to play fighting games with).

 

 

I liked Tekken 5 a lot. Very much. It felt a lot more like Tekken 3/TTT than Tekken 4. I was kicking people's asses with Yoshimitsu and Paul Phoenix, even though I hadn't played it before. LOTS of TTT and T3 in my history. :D

The game felt fluid and natural again - T4 felt kind of off, somehow. Kind of like how Civilization III felt off but I couldn't pinpoint why.

 

There is still a lame Eddy Gordo-like Character, like in T4, they just renamed him and made him a chick, I think.

 

But with no online play, and no competent friends to play against, I am passing at this point. Too Bad.

 

PS - offtopic - Fighting game folks (Futurevoid has it IIRC). I have boned up a bit on Guilty Gear X2 as I bought it last weekend. And I will get SF Anniversary within the next few days (thinking of preordering for the nifty Ryu bust on EBgames). I am live-enabled and somewhat competent with GGX2. :D When will the gamertag list be done? :D

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Green,

 

Feel free to add me to your list if you haven't. I would *LOVE* to have someone to play Guilty Gear with. I've literally gone online twice with it and played with the masses (who don't talk much which is half the fun of a fighting game). I'm also picking up Street Fighter this week so I'm sure we'll get some matches in. I'll say again also that if you are a fan of fighting games (as I am) and want something fun as hell to play online, you can't go wrong with Mortal Kombat Deception. Dead or Alive Ultimate has also been moving up the charts lately with me since we've gotten a few games together (though the lag can still be unbearable at times).

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I rented MK:Deception but I got constant disconnects with it. Could barely get through a game.

 

I thought it was my wireless bridging setup, but Halo 2 and GGX play just fine online with no problems.

 

Perhaps MK needs too much bandwidth or something. I do have the cheap cable modem connection (384/128) but my ping time is usually sub 30-40ms.

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Tekken 1, 2, & 3 are included in both the regular and bundle right?

 

Correct Dave.

 

As far as your disconnects go Green, I have no idea what to tell you on that one. I would recommend possibly a direct connect to your modem as I've logged well over 250 matches in MK: Deception without a single disconnect. It's by far one of the most dependable online games I've played as I've only gotten a hint of lag in three instances I can remember.

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Actually word from most journalists that have been exposed to the games on the Tekken 5 disc is that they are full arcade ports. Here is a quote from Gamespot:

 

Actually, that leads into what's possibly the greatest of Tekken 5's extras: Anyone who needs a refresher on the Tekken series' past milestones will get it as part of Tekken 5, because the game will feature a special "arcade history" mode featuring fully playable arcade versions of the original Tekken, Tekken 2, and Tekken 3. The latter two games earned extremely high scores from GameSpot back in their days (the first Tekken slightly predates GameSpot's launch in 1996), and much of the gameplay from subsequent games in the series was derived from them. So while these games might not look all that great by today's standards, especially not the original (with its weirdly proportioned characters), they still play great, and it'll be excellent having them bundled with Tekken 5. In case you're wondering, later Tekken titles, like Tekken 4 and Tekken Tag Tournament, won't be included. Check your PS2 bargain bin if you want to get your hands on those.

 

EDIT: Even if they were just the PS1 versions, I remember the first and second game being substantially improved for thier PS1 releases. Three was the only one that had to have some changes done in the graphics arena for it's PS1 debut and it was still considered one hell of a port in it's day.

 

In the end, you get three free games either way with your purchase of Tekken 5. Not sure what there is to be disappointed about in that regard. It's not as though you have to pay a premium for them.

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Tekken 1 and 2 for the PS actually were arcade ports, since the arcade machine was basically a Playstation. Tekken 3 had slightly enhanced Playstation hardware. Given how many times we've all heard "arcade perfect" misused, I wouldn't be suprised if the marketing machine would give that label to the already existing Tekken 3.

 

Like I said, I don't know what I was really expecting. It's kinda like getting all excited over trading 1 dollar for 100 pennies, and then doing the math later. ;)

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Tekken 1 and 2 for the PS actually were arcade ports, since the arcade machine was basically a Playstation

 

Tekken 1 was of course pretty much identical as you noted, but it's enhancements were in the content department. Such as new playable characters (sub-bosses etc.), modes and what not (which both Tekken 2 and 3 saw quite of bit of as well.)

 

Tekken 2 actually saw slight enhancements to it's visuals upon release for Playstation. Namco was able to pull out superior light sourcing on several maps and an overall smoother look to the games characters when it came time to translate it to the Playstation hardware.

 

Tekken 3 was the most "controversial" (for lack of a better word) of the three as there were wide spread reports and comparison shots of sacrifices that needed to be made to get the game on the PS1. Some arena backgrounds were changed into 2D scrolling maps (where as they had a more 3D look in the arcade), characters appeared much blockier and the texture coloring and depth was far superior due to the arcade boards more rich color pallete. You can take a look at a comparison shot below:

 

Arcade Version:

 

tekken32.jpg

 

PSX version:

 

tekken3.jpg

 

A good test to see which version of these games appear on the disc itself may be to take a gander at the Tekken 3 screenies that Gamepost has posted.

 

Like I said, I don't know what I was really expecting. It's kinda like getting all excited over trading 1 dollar for 100 pennies, and then doing the math later.

 

I gotcha but I guess my point of view is that if I have to shell out those hundred pennies anyway and I happen get three extra back for nothing....go me! :)

 

EDIT:

 

Here is a screenie that pretty much proves we are getting the arcade version of Tekken 2 at least. I think the other two games will more than likely be the same Dave:

 

Tekken 2 Ver.B (Arcade version listing in the arcade history of the Tekken 5 disc)

 

Here is a screen of Tekken 3 as it appears in Tekken 5:

 

Tekken 3

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Actually, a large part of the difference in picture quality in those Tekken 3 shots is that the PS was running in composite, by the looks of things. Tekken 3 arcade doesn't look hugely better to me if connected well. In fact, I prefer the look of Bleemcast Tekken 3 to the arcade version.

 

The big difference here isn't image quality, though, it's the great news that, since it's the arcade version, no-one gets to pick Gon. I really, really hate that little git.

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a large part of the difference in picture quality in those Tekken 3 shots is that the PS was running in composite

 

Actually, those shots are straight from a PSX dev units. That screenshot was released during the games development to show the progress that was being made during Tekken 3's development time. Not sure what connection was used to take the screenie (be it composite or s-video).

 

Tekken 3 arcade doesn't look hugely better to me if connected well.

 

The picture was only to illustrate Iain. There *ARE* differences between the arcade and PS1 version. Most of the changes were done to the backgrounds, as they saw the majority of real sacrifices. The character models also suffered but not to a huge degree. If you had the PSX version running through a component cable and stuck it next to the arcade version you would still notice the changes.

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Well Gamespot chimes in with thier very enthusiastic review:

 

Gamespot awards Tekken 5 a 9.2!

 

They mention the fighting is very fast, quite deep as well as a return to basics for the series (completely ignoring Tekken 4). In terms of graphics they just about had a coniption fit on themselves:

 

When it comes to image quality and character models, you'd be hard pressed to find a better looking PlayStation 2 game than this. Tekken 5 looks simply astounding--way above and beyond what you would think the PlayStation 2 is capable of. The character models are smooth and lifelike, with skin tones and textures that make them look alive, as opposed to the plastic-looking fighters found in some other games. The backgrounds are widely varied, and some of them are even breathtaking. Again, it's the sort of stuff you'd expect from a high-end Xbox title or a great-looking PC game--not something you'd expect from the PlayStation 2 hardware. From the fight arena that surrounds you with bloodthirsty onlookers and their van--which happens to be hanging from a hook a few feet above the ground--to the inside of a temple that happens to be on fire, you'll find a wide variety of amazing stuff here. This may be the PlayStation 2's best-looking game to date, and it's hard to imagine anything else topping it this far along in the cycle. Support for widescreen displays and progressive scan support only helps to make the image look that much better. But make no mistake, Tekken 5 looks incredible regardless of the mode you run it in, and the quality of the visuals of course helps make the action itself that much better.

 

The game releases tommorrow. Time to revisit the series for me. If only it were online too.

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Well, I got burned by Tekken 4 (paying $50 for basically a worse version of a game I played to death 2 years earlier isn't my idea of fantastic) so I was initially not really that excited about Tekken 5. The news that Tekken 5 did in fact not suck and would include arcade ports of the first three games changed my mind though, so I picked up the Ultimate Fanboy Zombie Collector's Edition today (hooray for no obscene shipping charges, boo for taxes). First impression is: holy shit the Hori pad is huge. I had only seen pictures of it online, which really gave no sense of scale. Even the large, weighty packaging didn't give it away, as I figured they could still have a normal sized pad tucked in there with padding around it. Let's get this out in the open - this thing is larger than most babies. The stick is absolutely fantastic as well, with the pleasantly solid clicking sound it makes when you push it in each direction. Even if the actual game turns out to be rubbish, I'll still be more than happy with my purchase. I should have some more impressions up later.

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Even if the actual game turns out to be rubbish

 

It isn't. It's a damn fine game in fact. I just spent the last five hours digging into the story mode and arcade ranking system. The story mode is basically a series of fights with small cut scenes in between that try to explain the purpose of your character joining the King Iron Fist Tournament. It?s pretty straightforward stuff in terms of storytelling, but it remains entertaining nonetheless. It's also where you'll make the majority of your money, (to customize your characters look) as well as unlock the hidden characters in the game.

 

The arcade ranking system works very similar to that of Virtua Fighter 4 in that you start out as a beginner and move your way up the ranks after a continuous number of fights. VF: Evolution kind of tied a bit of a story into the proceedings in that you were a person hitting each arcade and moving up the ranks. Tekken foregoes this but keeps the core of the mechanic itself. The fights are fast and furious and after you win each round you are awarded a set amount of gold and can then select your next opponent at the bottom right hand corner of the screen by moving the D-pad up or down (they are listed according to ranking. The better ranked opponent you take out the faster you move up). The game does a great job of telling you when you can advance as promotion matches are highlighted right at the beginning of the match and a little signal flashes at the bottom right telling you "Chance for Promotion" throughout the entire fight. If there was anything that Namco did well in cribbing from Virtua Fighter, it was this gameplay mode. It makes it a blast for single players that may not have the opportunity to play against others.

 

Aside from that you can enter the Devil Within mode which is a third person beat-em-up ala the old Tekken Force modes from previous Tekken titles. I haven't given this mode a shot yet as I've been moving my way up to 6th Ken rank in the arcade challenge. Single players can also compete in time trial modes, team battle (select up to 8 fighters and take on another team of your choosing), survival, and the practice mode to hone your skills.

 

The practice mode is pretty in-depth giving you a full command list as well as showing each move being done by your selected character. (As well as the button inputs so you can check the timing.) You can of course change the position of your opponent to accommodate different situations as well as go into a defensive training mode where you can practice defending against specific moves. All in all, the entire entire practice mode is wonderfully setup and should help newbie?s get acclimated quickly. I'm somewhat remiss to compare it to the training mode in Virtua Fighter 4 as Tekken just isn't as deep a fighting game as VF. Suffice it to say that if I were to, VF4's training mode remains the standard by which all fighting game tutorials should be judged.

 

Along with the different modes of play you also have access right off the bat to the arcade history area. This is where you can play the arcade versions of Tekken, Tekken 2 (ver.B), and Tekken 3 along with a fun little space shooter called StarBlade. These are indeed the arcade versions and not simply ports of the Playstation releases. Tekken 2 remains my absolute favorite of the bunch due it being the first appearance of Lei Wu Long. Tekken 3, however, remains infinitely playable and comes across the best of the three in terms of visuals.

 

As far as presentation options, you can enter the Theater mode which allows you to view all of the unlocked CG cinematics for each character along with the games opening. You can also listen to the games full soundtrack which includes selections from previous Tekken games.

 

When you are done watching the movies and listening to the audio, you'll more than likely move right along to the customization area where you can spend you?re hard earned money. Each character has a variety of options you can change including the color of their shirt, pants, gloves, head gear etc. You can also add glasses, hats and more if you so choose. It's a neat little diversion but as of right now it seems very limited. I'm hoping the more I play, the more I will unlock in terms of chooseable clothing/accessories.

 

The gameplay for Tekken 5 is almost entirely rooted in the style of Tekken 2/3. Anyone disappointed with Tekken 4 will love the revisions the developers have made here. The move sets available for each character very much mirror those found in Tekken 3 but with a slew of new combos and hard hitting maneuvers. Each character still has their token "charge" moves that lop off an inordinate amount of health but leave you open to attack. Character balance seems pretty decent, though from my play time I'm finding Feng and Kazuya to be a touch to powerful.

 

As noted the combat here is fast paced and once you find yourself in the middle of a painful combo, you're reaction time needs to be very quick to actually escape. You still have the option of pulling off some very cool looking 10-hitters of your own that will all but drain your opponents health down to nothing but as with most fighting games, timing is what you will be practicing the most. I'm using the Street Fighter Arcade stick I recently purchased to play the game and it continues to perform really well for me in this game.

 

The arena's in which you face off are quite sizeable but you will still have the opportunity to pull off some nasty wall juggles. Sections of the fight area are, in fact, cordoned off. Though this helps to make learning how to side-step properly that much more important. Not too mention that doing so will open up even more impressive grapple/throw attacks. There is also a nice level of interactivity to be had in these stages as taking a brutal hit will usually destroy a section of the floor, or cause an army of gold coins to jump into the air. When it's all said and done, this is Tekken in its purest form. It still lacks the true depth of Virtua Fighter but it also doesn't require Zen-like dedication to actually become proficient. This makes the game more comparable to Soul Calibur in so far as that on the surface you can create some extraordinarily cool looking moves even if you're not entirely sure of what you're doing. However, if you take the time to learn, you can be a real show off and have the satisfaction of knowing you're confident in your abilities.

 

Visually this is the most impressive fighting game on the Playstation 2. Hell given that we are nearing the end of this generation, this is an impressive looking game period. It seems the more we move closer to the end, the more these developers seem to squeeze out of Sony's hardware. The game supports both widescreen and 480p (though the arcade versions of the older Tekken games do not.). The game exhibits no slowdown whatsoever. The character models are extremely life-like in appearance and the detail prevalent is on par with some of the wonderful things we saw in Tecmo's Dead or Alive Ultimate. Small things like Lei's sash flowing in the breeze or the convincing hair texture on Marduk's chest really help to make the game look convincing.

 

The fight arenas vary from an abandoned treasure filled cave to a mountain top surrounded by a dragon statue. Each one is rendered with a great deal of animation and interactivity in mind. There is a stage in which you must do battle on an alcove with a large waterfall in the background. There are various puddles of water that surround you and are affected by your movement, as well as a fence that can be shattered when you slam your opponent into it. All the while the waterfall flows beautifully in the background creating an almost calming affect amidst the chaos. On a technical level, the game is second only to Dead or Alive Ultimate in it's genre and that's saying allot for anyone that has witnessed that game in motion.

 

I'm glad I decided to revisit this series after being turned off by some of the later entries including Tekken Tag Tournament and Tekken 4. I don't think there is a fighting game this generation that can come close the brilliance that is Virtua Fighter 4 in my eyes. Tekken 5 can however stand amongst games like Soul Calibur 2, Dead or Alive, Guilty Gear and Street Fighter 3 in terms of quality and fun. Even if you have no else to play this game with, it's still worth a purchase as the amount of content on this one disc is enough to keep a fighting game fanatic very busy for a good while to come. This is definitely highly recommended for anyone craving a fun filled fighting game. :tu

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I don't think there is a fighting game this generation that can come close the brilliance that is Virtua Fighter 4 in my eyes. Tekken 5 can however stand amongst games like Soul Calibur 2, Dead or Alive, Guilty Gear and Street Fighter 3 in terms of quality and fun.

 

That may be good enough for me. I do adore VF4: Evolution. Nothing else can come close to it in my opinion... Still, if Namco bother to bring the Tekken 5 bundle with the arcade stick to Europe, I may well give it a look see.

 

Daniel

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