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What stocks do you own?


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I own EPP, an energy company

I own GRNM, a GPS software/hardware company

I own EMC, a storage company

 

Anyone own any videogame companies?

 

I was happy to see my company Garmin was featured on Fox News' "Bulls and Bears" show this morning. I invested in Garmin because I believe in the company, not because a consultant told me to. So it was fun to see the company played up on a popular television show.

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Nortel. Yes, that's right. I own some Nortel. :cry:

Lorus Therapeutics, a cancer research company

Com Dev International, a wireless communications company

 

I have been hanging onto my Nortel shares for a while now. Bought them after a huge drop in 2000. I bought more shares three times as the price kept coming down to lower my average. Now, with all this talk of scandals, inflated profit-margins and such, things are not looking too good.

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Only thing I own that's not a part of my 401k, etc., are shares from the company I work for, Accenture (ACN). We've got a pretty nice Employee Stock Purchase Plan.

 

 

Same here. I put 10% of my income into my companies (LSI Logic) stock purchase plan. We get a 15% discount off market value. Its worked out very nice for me so far. Just bought a vehicle recently thanks to the $ I got from selling a bunch of shares a few months ago. My 401k on the other hand...I dont even look at it. I'm 100% into diversified stocks and put 10% of my income into that as well. I dont plan on touching that $ for a long time. I'm still a young lad. :)

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I have:

 

Atari

Interplay (worth a whopping .048 per share!)

Lion's Gate Films

Pepsi Bottling Group

 

And a bunch of near-worthless tech stocks that would cost me more to sell them off than just keep them. I suppose I could have Ameritrade issue me the certificates so I can line the bird cage... ;)

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The timing of this thread is rather funny. I was left stocks in a will a couple of years ago, in Wembley PLC which is a group that used to own Wembley Staduium here in the UK, but is now owner of vast entertainment media. Anyway, it's being bought out, so I'm getting ?1700 for my shares in the coming months. I think the buyout was from one of the major US Casino giants.

 

Otherwise that's it, but I will probably reinvest the ?1700 in something else.

 

Daniel

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Pretty much just one stock in my ROTH IRA now: VSTMX. Or Vanguard Stock Total Market Index. Very boring, watch the grass grow, but steady gainer index fund.

 

Otherwise, spread out over whatever options the 401k offers. Usually weighted heavily to aggressive and mid cap stocks as I'm only 31 and have some time to retirement.

 

Don't hold any personal stocks anymore, after 2001 I realized I didn't know what the heck I was doing. And as they say, when you sit down to play poker and can't spot the sucker, you are the sucker! Our company also has an ESPP where we get stock for 15% off, I usually just use it as extra income though and sell it as soon as it arrives. Been burned so often in tech I learned that greed is every bit as deadly as fear in stocks.

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Anyone here ever meet with a financial advisor. I am doing that tomorrow. Hopefully he'll help put things in perspective.

 

I don't actively invest in individual stocks. I think I am pretty diversified since I have just two tech stocks, an energy stock, a bunch of bonds, 401K, 529 college fund, and soon plan to start investing in either mutual or index funds. I guess the important thing is to understand your purpose for making each investment. 401k and 529 are obvious. Everything else is sort of less defined, and that is where I can get into trouble.

 

I want to buy a house in about 4 years, so that is my shortest term goal at the moment and that is what we'll concentrate on when we meet.

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My company used to give us free seminars on getting the most out of our 401k. We have a lot of option on where to put our money.

 

One of the rules-of-thumb I remember hearing:

 

Take your Age, subtract it from 100, and that is the percentage of your savings that you can feel "safe" about investing in riskier stocks. So if you are 25, 100-25 = 75% in stocks, the rest in mutual funds, bonds, etc. As you get older, you move away fromt the riskier stuff, since you are closer to retirement and can't afford the risk of larger losses.

 

Ask the Financial Advisor about this, Keith. I'm curious to find out if it is still considered a good rule of thumb.

 

Carlos.

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Take your Age, subtract it from 100, and that is the percentage of your savings that you can feel "safe" about investing in riskier stocks. So if you are 25, 100-25 = 75% in stocks, the rest in mutual funds, bonds, etc. As you get older, you move away fromt the riskier stuff, since you are closer to retirement and can't afford the risk of larger losses.

 

 

That is exactlly how I am doing it. I'm still only 28 thus the reason why I put so much of my savings into stocks.

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Originally posted by kfredericks@May 24 2004, 07:14 PM

Anyone here ever meet with a financial advisor. I am doing that tomorrow. Hopefully he'll help put things in perspective.

 

I don't actively invest in individual stocks. I think I am pretty diversified since I have just two tech stocks, an energy stock, a bunch of bonds, 401K, 529 college fund, and soon plan to start investing in either mutual or index funds. I guess the important thing is to understand your purpose for making each investment. 401k and 529 are obvious. Everything else is sort of less defined, and that is where I can get into trouble.

 

I want to buy a house in about 4 years, so that is my shortest term goal at the moment and that is what we'll concentrate on when we meet.

Keith:

 

It's a good idea to meet with a FA, but if you haven't already signed on the dotted lines, there are a few things you should look out for:

 

1) Financial advisors typically get kickbacks to enroll people in certain funds. Watch out for front and back-loaded funds he/she will try to get you to buy into. These days, simple no-load index funds are as good / better investments.

 

2) If you're going to pay a FA, you may as well pay one who works at an institution in which he / she can both consolidate your money at one place AND be able to act on your behalf in case of emergency, a place like Merrill or a bank or whatever. In other words, if you're (G-d forbid) held ransom in some third world country one day or whatever, you'd be able to call him/her and have money wired to you. It's also one call to liquidate / buy rather than two / three, reducing headache, downtime, and potential for errors.

 

3) If you're looking to buy a house in the short term, it is key that you don't get involved in any stocks, funds, programs, etc. that will punish you for getting out early.

 

4) Four years is a short amount of time for investments. As such, you'd want to go relatively low risk as to be sure you have the money when you find that dream home.

 

5) If the FA tells you that he / she has a "secret to wealth," walk away. No, run away.

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I don't own any individual stocks. My 401k, IRA, and other non-retirement accounts are made up of mutual funds. I work for a brokerage firm, so I have them invested within our own funds (although I am not required to). After all the mutual fund scandals, I can honestly say I am glad I am invested in our funds.

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Cane, might I inquiry as to the identity of your employer?

 

Funny thing is my last 401k was with Putnam and new one is Mass Mutual. I usually just rollover previous 401k to my new companies (in the interest of getting just one quarterly report to read), which is what I did this time. After all the Putnam scandals and so forth, I figured they would be in the toilet. But was pleasantly surprised Putnam had made me about 15% in the past 4 months, and once I rolled to MM it has now declined 15%. Hehe, I'm sure it's jus the market but gave me a chuckle...

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So I met with my advisor. He is a long-time broker for my family. I don't have to pay him anything, and he is already managing a good chunk of assets for my family. Here is a summary of what I got out of the meeting:

 

Forget REITs, their party is over, and their benefit is dividends. I don't need dividends because I'm getting adequate fixed income from my bonds.

 

Increase my 401k from 15% to 20%

 

Get 20-30 year term life insurance, not with my company because it is risky to get life insurance with your company.

 

I shouldn't need more than 15K in cash as backup given that my company provides 6 months severence

 

If I can afford it, after upping my 401k, start a Roth IRA.

 

Increase my 529 College fund from $50/month to $100/month if possible.

 

Index funds don't perform better than mutual funds, so let's start, if I have the surplus, investing in mutual funds.

 

When it comes time to buy a house, sell don't rent out my condo, as I was considering.

 

Forget annuities.

 

That's all that pops to mind at the moment.

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