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LOTR: Return of the King Extended cut


JoeyN
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In Entertainment Weekly's ROTK special issue they reveal a few of the extended scenes for the dvd release later this year:

 

1)Gandalf Confronts Saruman at the ruins of Isengard

2)Aragorn treats Ewoyn in the House of Healing after her fight with the Witch King.

3)Faramirs attraction to Ewoyn begins in the House of Healing

4)Merry pledges fealty to King Theoden

5)Lord of the Nazgul faces Gandolf during siege of Minas Tirath

6)Aragorn uses the palantir to reveal himself to Sauron as Insildur's heir before he goes to Mordor for the final battle

7)The Mouth of Sauron taunts Aragorn and his troops at Mordors black gate, showing them Frodo's mithril shirt

 

There are more but those are the ones they mention.

 

capt

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Finally some solid news of the EE. I was so disappointed they did not put a preview on the Theatrical Cut DVD. Hell, if those are the only scenes they added back in, it would be worth it just for that. :)

 

Also, we need to see more of Sam and Frodo's journey through Mordor. In the Theatrical Cut it seems like they got to Mount Doom too fast after Frodo's rescue.

 

-Dean-

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If you've played through the game, #5 is a live action cut scene, and as soon as I saw it I just knew it had to be in the extended edition.

 

They also had #7 as a CGI cut scene and I was hoping it would make its way in as well.

 

I was very impressed how EA integrated the game with the movie.

 

Needless to say, I'm very much looking forward to a full day of LOTR when the final extended edition comes out :)

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I'm just praying they still have the good sense not to include any Scouring of the Shire nonsense.

 

Although I'll have to disagree with you Striker and say I wish they could have it in there - I don't much care for the return home and everything's happy ending they put in the movie. Not that I don't understand why they did it (time would be my guess), but as much as I loved the film, I felt it lacked a bit there when compared to the original story.

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Romier: Thanks, that's good to know. ;)

 

Kain: I just didn't like it because I felt like it was a major departure in tone from the rest of the books. After having endured the most epic quest imaginable, I thought it just seemed unnecessary and almost like Tolkien thought he had to throw something in there just to show how much the hobbits had grown and could take care of themselves without their human, elf, and dwarf allies (which I could see as a pretty valid complaint, what with someone seemingly always having to come to the hobbits' rescue).

 

But if you really just thought it would be a better ending than the drawn-out conclusion that the movie ended up with, I can see your point of view. I personally liked it the way it was presented, but I can see how it would put some people off.

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Originally posted by ChoiceStriker@Jun 2 2004, 04:20 PM

Romier: Thanks, that's good to know. ;)

 

Kain: I just didn't like it because I felt like it was a major departure in tone from the rest of the books. After having endured the most epic quest imaginable, I thought it just seemed unnecessary and almost like Tolkien thought he had to throw something in there just to show how much the hobbits had grown and could take care of themselves without their human, elf, and dwarf allies (which I could see as a pretty valid complaint, what with someone seemingly always having to come to the hobbits' rescue).

 

But if you really just thought it would be a better ending than the drawn-out conclusion that the movie ended up with, I can see your point of view. I personally liked it the way it was presented, but I can see how it would put some people off.

I see where you're coming from, and actually think that they handled the ending quite well in the movie given the choice to leave the scouring out. I think part of what I missed from the scouring story line is how it showed that Frodo was never entirely healed after everything he went through (so not even the main parts of kicking Saruman out). I know they portrayed that somewhat in the films, but I had one friend, who has never read the books, ask "Why'd Frodo leave?" after we walked out of the movie. Of course, trying to portray that much in the movies (where years go by, but not all is well) would have taken a good bit of screen time that they simply didn't have. But either way, I love the film, and love the books, so I can always go and read the parts they left out. :D

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I did read recently that Merry will now find Pippin on Pelennor Fields at night... This would help fix a continuity error that arises in the theatrical cut. When Pippin strikes the Witch King in the heel, Pippin falls to the ground there in pain. When Merry finds him later, Pippin is elsewhere on the field, crushed under an orc beside a dead oliphaunt.

 

Howard Shore did in the region of forty-five minutes of music for the extended edition, so it's going to be close to an hour of footage back in I'd wager.

 

I am curious what, if anything, will be extended in the final scenes. Will Gandalf reveal himself to be a ringbearer at the harbour, will we see Legolas and Gimli set off on their journey...etc....etc. I liked how it ended theatrically; as a matter of fact I adore the very last scene in the film of Sam coming home, and Wood narrating Frodo's lines to Sam from the book.

 

That being said, I still long for greater emphasis on the fact that the book ends with an "all things must pass" motif. Middle Earth is not some magical planet (as Tolkien maintained, it's England before history was recorded). The book ends when many creatures and races are becoming extinct.

Treebeard has some exceptional dialogue toward the end of the book focusing on the changing of the forests, and the appendices of course go as far as detailing the deaths of all the characters, Sam's departure to the Grey Havens and Legolas and Gimli's sacrifice ultimately marking the final end to it all.

 

Do I think the extended edition will dig deeper into these themes and happenings? I'd be amazed if they do as generally it is too much to cover, but an extended focus on the literal 'end of all things' would be appreciated even if it were in dialogue alone. I can accept the current ending knowing what I know from the books to fill in the blanks, but the film's ending could have been more emotional had it hammered home the fact that all you've come to know and love in the three films is going to fade and die.

 

Daniel

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Do I think the extended edition will dig deeper into these themes and happenings? I'd be amazed if they do as generally it is too much to cover, but an extended focus on the literal 'end of all things' would be appreciated even if it were in dialogue alone. I can accept the current ending knowing what I know from the books to fill in the blanks, but the film's ending could have been more emotional had it hammered home the fact that all you've come to know and love in the three films is going to fade and die.

 

I completely agree & I hope that something does get adressed on this in the EE. I am looking forward to the Mouth of Sauron sequence though.

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