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Front projectors? Educate me, please :)


Covak
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I'm using a 19" CRT for my PC and video gaming. A couple of months ago I got a Dell 2405FPW (24" widescreen LCD), but it turns out LCDs are not for me. So I'm still looking around for a new display. Seen a little talk about front projectors around here, so I'm curious. What are they like these days? I'd love to hear from anyone who has experience with HD displays and CRTs and LCDs and rear projection TVs.

 

How's the picture? Don't things look really pixelated considering the low resolutions and the huge screen size? How often do you have to replace the bulb? Are you constantly looking up? Do you even want to use one for regular PC use?

 

Another thread here lead me to this and I was like "Damn, that sounds pretty nice for $1,300..." But then I imagine you want a nice screen, and the bulbs look pricey too. Is it really worth it?

 

The way my gaming room is setup it would be pretty easy to ceiling-mount a projector and just put an 80" screen on the wall right behind where my monitor now sits. In my imagination that's pretty dreamy. But then, I thought that 2405FPW sounded great, too...

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I wouldn't go with the LCD projector you linked to if you weren't happy with your desktop LCD performance. Your only real upgrade from LCD would be a DLP projector - at best, for a reasonable price you could possibly get 1024x768 4:3.

 

My projector was the best purchase I ever made (Infocus X1 DLP - 800x600). But I don't really use it with my PC much...too hard to drag it out into the living room. Mine sees use for Halo on Xbox, though, mucho fun on big screen (about 100" I think...maybe 92"...I forget).

 

Bulbs are pricey but take forever to wear out. 3000-4000 hours on my X1 is a lot of hours...we're not even to 1500 yet IIRC.

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I've had a DLP projector for 2.5 years now and I absolutely love it. I admit I was somewhat queasy when I plunked down $3200 on it, but it turned out to be one of the best purchases I've ever made. In the process I've sold projectors to 3 of my friends who watched movies/gamed at my place.

 

It has completely transformed my movie watching at home.

 

How's the picture? Don't things look really pixelated considering the low resolutions and the huge screen size?

I sit about 12-13 feet from my screen which has an ~80 inch image and the image is very smooth, I can't see pixels even if I look for them.

 

How often do you have to replace the bulb?

My projector has a bulb-life of 2000 hours, which these days is on the low side. I am still on my first bulb after 2.5 years, with 4% left. BTW, bulb life is not measured as the time after which the bulb will fail, it's the time after which the bulb should reach 50% brightness. I bought a replacement bulb last year just to be ready, the replacement was $400.

 

Are you constantly looking up?

You can position the image wherever you want. I recommend an image at eye-level, so you aren't looking up at all, it's very comfortable. I had one friend who pointed his projector way up on the wall and I couldn't figure out why. I think he was just emulating a movie theater without thinking. It was not a nice way to watch movies.

 

I think most projectors these days have multi-way keystone correction. On mine it's called "3D-reform" - which means the projector can be off axis but still project a perfectly squared image. Ideally you should use as little geometry correction as possible.

 

Do you even want to use one for regular PC use?

I have my projector connected to my Mac, it's not terribly practical for normal use. But one of my favorite things is to run a music visualizer on the projector, very cool.

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Hey Covak,

 

I know a couple more LCVGers are front projector owners too so I'm sure they'll be chiming in with their thoughts. [EDIT: It appears some of them already posted while I was writing my version of War and Peace. :D ]

 

There are three main things to consider when looking for a front projector:

 

1) Ambient Light Control - Does the room you plan on using it in have large uncovered windows? If so, a front projector may not be for you. If you have fairly good ambient light control, you should be fine. In my case, most of the time, I watch it with the mini-blinds closed and with a 75-watt lamp lighting up the room. Of course, it looks much better with all the lights off, but the wife acceptance factor would be nil. ;) Keep in mind that the more lumens a projector outputs, the more it can counteract any ambient light but also it also decreases the contrast ratio (which, ambient light also negatively affects). Take most projector's lumens rating with a grain of salt. They are usually measured running in high-power mode (which kicks the fan speed high and reduces the bulb life faster than than low power mode) and calibrated to achieve the brightest image, not the best image.

 

2) Projector Placement - Every projector has a throw distance range, basically the distance it has to be from the wall to achieve a projected image of a certain size (e.g. projector X can produce a 100" image at 15-18 feet, depending on the zoom setting used on the lens). This may be important if you wanted a 100" image but your room was only 12x12 feet. The offset is the amount vertically the image will be above or below an imaginary line projecting from the center of the lens. This may be important depending on where, vertically, you plan on placing the projector (e.g. if the offset is alot, it may make the image too high if the projector is placed on a coffee table). The exhaust ports are where the projector is blowing the hot air it's generating to cool it off (in some cases, this can be in the front, back, or sides). This may be important if you wanted to place your projector on a shelf against the wall and the exhaust port in the back doesn't have enough clearance to properly cool off the projector. So depending on where in the room you plan on placing the projector, how far it is from where you plan on projecting the image, and where vertically you want to place the projector (on the floor, on top of a coffee table, on a shelf, or mounted to the ceiling), some projectors may work while others may not.

 

3) Bulb Life - Unlike CRTs and plasmas, LCD and DLP projectors have consumable, user-replaceable bulbs. Most projector manufacturers rate their bulb life expectancy to be about 2,000 hours (some go as high as 5,000 hours for the Panasonic AE700 in low-power mode and other manufacturers, like Sanyo, don't list a bulb life expectancy figure). So on average, if you watched the projector for 5.5 hours a day for one year, you would go through one average 2,000 hour bulb every year. Replacement bulbs can range anywhere from $200 (for some Epson models) to $400+. Most are around $300-350. You should consider how often you plan on using it a day and figure out how much it will cost you per year. Then consider if you are willing to pay that amount. Another thing to consider: frequent power (on/off) cycles seem to reduce the life expectancy of a bulb (much like if you kept flicking a lamp on and off). Are you the kind of person that flicks the TV on for a few minutes then flicks it off, several times a day? If so, you may not get the quoted bulb life expectancy.

 

How's the picture? Don't things look really pixelated considering the low resolutions and the huge screen size?

 

The general rule is that for standard/enhanced definition projectors (up to 960x540), sitting 2x the width of the projected image away will make pixelation/screendoor vanish. For high definition projectors (1280x720 and up), you can get closer without seeing pixelation/screendoor (around 1.5x). This varies from person to person though.

 

As far as the quality of the picture, I would say it is comparable to other display technologies with a much better price-per-diagonal-inch ratio.

 

How often do you have to replace the bulb?

 

FYI: I have a Sanyo Z1 and Sanyo doesn't list bulb life expectancy for their projectors. The bulb that came with the projector lasted about 800 hours. My second bulb lasted about 1,500 hours. My third bulb lasted about 800 hours. My current bulb is at about 800 hours. As I said in #3, how often you have to change the bulb depends on the projector/lamp, how often you use it, and how many times you cycle it on and off.

 

Are you constantly looking up?

 

This depends entirely on where you mount the projector and the screen. See #2.

 

Do you even want to use one for regular PC use?

 

Most current projectors have either a VGA or DVI input (or both). Many projector users connect their PCs to their projectors and use a program like PowerStrip to set their PC to display the exact resolution of their projector (1:1 pixel mapping).

 

But then I imagine you want a nice screen, and the bulbs look pricey too. Is it really worth it?

 

It looks surprisingly good just projected on a white wall. I built a DIY screen out of a 4'x8' sheet of Parkland Plastic from Home Depot for about $20. There are many DIY paint mixtures posted on the internet that users have found to closely resemble professional screens. You can get a cheaper professional screen for about $100-200. Of course, there are also higher priced options ($500-1,000) that improve the reflected light intensity (gain) and increase the black levels. It is by no means a necessity though.

 

The other great debate is LCD vs. DLP technology. Each one has it's strengths and weaknesses. LCDs are usually a bit cheaper and brighter, but usually have more visible pixelation/screendoor and much weaker contrast ratios/black levels than DLPs. Some people can also see rainbows and suffer from headaches/eye strain/nausea with DLPs (referring to the cheaper one chip/color wheel ones, not the more expensive 3 chip/no color wheel ones). This is entirely dependent on the person though and newer DLP technology (faster color wheels) is making this less and less of an issue.

 

If you are still interested in front projectors, I would you research it more then possibly look for some places that offer in-home demos (I think Infocus has done that with their projectors before) or have a generous return policy (like Circuit City) if you don't like it. Here are some links you should check out:

 

Projector Central

Low-end Projector AVS Forum

 

Here are some popular sub-$2K projectors to consider (prices from bhphotovideo.com unless otherwise noted):

Infocus Screenplay 4805 (16:9 854x480 DLP) - $999 after rebate

Optoma H31 (16:9 854x480 DLP) - $1,099

Mitsubishi HC3 (16:9 960x540 LCD) - $999

Sanyo Z1 (16:9 960x540 LCD) - $649

Sanyo Z2 (16:9 1280x720 LCD) - $1,099

Sanyo Z3 (16:9 1280x720 LCD) - $1,749

Infocus Screenplay 5000 (16:9 1280x720 LCD) - $1,799

Panasonic AE700 (16:9 1280x720 LCD) - $1,799 after rebate

Infocus X1 (4:3 800x600 DLP) - $549 after rebate refurbished at pcconnection.com

 

NOTE: I am in no way affiliated with bhphotovideo.com. I have however bought things from them before, without any issues, and their prices are usually competitive.

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Following up on Jeff's excellent post, I would agree that the screen may not be as big of a deal as you think. For the first few months i was projecting on a white wall and it looked fine. I eventually got a cheap screen (a business screen I inherited from my workplace) and the image improved a bit because it's pure white, and has somewhat better reflectance properties.

 

Lumens are not the most important number, contrast ratio is. But beware of projectors with incredibly high contrast numbers (like 6000:1), they usually achieve these numbers by dropping the lumens to ridiculously low levels.

 

On a purely subjective level, I have to say that even to this day I am frequently in awe of the image quality. This is particularly true of DVD with excellent transfers, and HD content is pretty staggering. Conversely, you really notice DVDs with substandard transfers. You will want to pair a projector with a good DVD player for best results. I managed to find a Panasonic RP-82 before they stopped making them...I'm not sure what I'd buy now, I'm kind of out of the loop.

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I've been researching this subject myself, and no one mentioned fan noise? :confused: Is this one of those things that only anal reviewers make note of, or is this a real concern?

 

Also, are the lamp fittings standardized? I'm concerned I'm going to end up needing a new lamp in 3 years and find out their out of production. :bh

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I've been researching this subject myself, and no one mentioned fan noise? :confused: Is this one of those things that only anal reviewers make note of, or is this a real concern?

 

I keep my projector in 'eco mode' which I like better than normal, and it has the benefit of cutting the fan noise way down. I don't even notice it. I can notice it in normal mode, though.

 

Also, are the lamp fittings standardized? I'm concerned I'm going to end up needing a new lamp in 3 years and find out their out of production. :bh

 

Hmm, I guess it depends on what you mean by standardized. They certainly aren't standard from one manufacturer to the next (AFAIK), but within a single manufacturer you may find that the same lamp is used on a variety of models. For example, NEC uses the lamp in my projector in about 5 or 6 different models. Even the newer HT1100, released more than a year after my model, uses the same lamp.

 

I'm not sure what the situation with other manufacturers is.

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I've been researching this subject myself, and no one mentioned fan noise? Is this one of those things that only anal reviewers make note of, or is this a real concern?

 

Fan noise is only really a concern when there's no other audio (like when the movie is at a silent part). In most cases, it becomes ambient noise your brain filters out, like the sound of the refrigerator running. On my Sanyo Z1, I actually turned UP the speed of the fan (and thus the noise) to help better cool down the projector. I still don't notice it and it's about 4-5 feet in front of me.

 

Also, are the lamp fittings standardized? I'm concerned I'm going to end up needing a new lamp in 3 years and find out their out of production.

 

Unfortunately, no, they are not standardized (although some projectors made by the same manufacturer do use the same bulbs). :bh However, I believe you can still buy new lamps on the internet for projectors that are 3+ years old.

 

Lumens are not the most important number, contrast ratio is. But beware of projectors with incredibly high contrast numbers (like 6000:1), they usually achieve these numbers by dropping the lumens to ridiculously low levels.

 

I agree. Contrast ratio is what gives an image punch and depth. Lumens and black levels are kind of overrated. Lumens are useful to couteract ambient light (the ambient light will flatten the contrast ratio anyway) but in a light-controlled environment, almost any projector produces enough lumens for a decent image. As far as black levels go, no projector is capable of displaying a true black, not even a 35mm projector at a movie theater. At best, you'll get a dark gray. Your brain will adjust to the dark grey as black and it won't even be an issue.

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Thanks for all the great info, guys! :)

 

It sounds like one problem for me might be the size of my room. It's not very big (maybe just 12' x 12'), and if I ceiling mount it I'd probably want it pointing down at a decent angle (I'd guess nearly 30 degrees). I think I could get it standing at just about any height, though, but it'd still have to be up pretty high to get over my head (without being too high up on the wall).

 

I probably should have mentioned my big problems with the 2405FPW (and just about every other LCD monitor I've ever seen):

 

1) Slow response time. I know lots of gamers say 16ms or less is great, but to me 12ms (2405FPW's average, with 16ms worst-case) was no good. I imagine LCD projectors have the same problem?

 

2) The black levels and viewing angles. I'd imagine that with projectors the viewing angle problem doesn't really exist. And y'all have touched on the not-so-great black levels. But do blacks have that backlight glow to them (on a good screen)? Are they even a problem anymore with DLP projectors?

 

From what I've heard/read so far, and knowing how picky I am, my initial reaction is that a 720p DLP projector would be nice. Not sure I want to spend that much, but a demo could persuade me to save for one. I'll have to look into HT stores in my area...

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I'm not sure about response time on LCD projectors, I'm not sure I've seen it mentioned in projector reviews (which I'm not so up on these days). One thing that may make a difference is the size of the LCD. In a projector, I believe the LCD (or DLP chip) is very small, my DLP's chip is .75" across. I assume that LCD is similarly sized, which could change the properties of it compared to big direct-view LCD screens. Obviously I'm speculating about this, so don't take my word for it.

 

Black level. I would say that projectors do suffer when the black level in the source material is substandard. I think you notice it more. But with decent source material (which would be the vast majority of DVDs, and essentially all games), you see blacks as 'black' and you see detail in blacks (I'm talking DLP here, which has traditionally had better black detail than LCD, although I think LCD is getting better these days).

 

Viewing angle is no problem at all, you can sit anywhere and get the same quality view.

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Thanks for all the great info, guys!

 

I'm glad you found the info useful. :)

 

It sounds like one problem for me might be the size of my room. It's not very big (maybe just 12' x 12'), and if I ceiling mount it I'd probably want it pointing down at a decent angle (I'd guess nearly 30 degrees). I think I could get it standing at just about any height, though, but it'd still have to be up pretty high to get over my head (without being too high up on the wall).

 

A projector such as the Optoma H31 might work in your room. At 11' from the screen/wall, it can produce an image anywhere from 74-92". It has a 7.42 degree offset:

 

A = distance (in inches) from lens to the screen

B = 0.13023 (7.42 degree tangent)

C = distance from ground/ceiling to center of lens

D = total distance from ground/ceiling to bottom/top of image

 

(A x B) + C = D

 

So for the Optoma H31 at 11' from the screen/wall (let's go with a 92" screen size), mounted level on the ceiling with about 12" from the ceiling to the center of the lens:

 

(132 x 0.13023) + 6 = ~23"

 

So the top of the image would be 23" from the ceiling. If your ceiling is 8" high, the top of the image would be 6'1" off the ground and the bottom of the image would be 2'4" off the ground.

 

Moving the projector closer would reduce the offset (in inches). Tilting it slightly would also increase/decrease the offset but you'll have to use digital keystoning to correct the resulting trapezoid image. Some projectors have lens shifts where you can adjust the lens assembly in the projector horizontally/vertically. There are many variables to account for but that also means that there's most likely a projector that can work in your space.

 

I probably should have mentioned my big problems with the 2405FPW (and just about every other LCD monitor I've ever seen):

 

1) Slow response time. I know lots of gamers say 16ms or less is great, but to me 12ms (2405FPW's average, with 16ms worst-case) was no good. I imagine LCD projectors have the same problem?

 

I honestly can't say. If I were to venture a guess, it would be the same since it's based off of similar technology.

 

2) The black levels and viewing angles. I'd imagine that with projectors the viewing angle problem doesn't really exist. And y'all have touched on the not-so-great black levels. But do blacks have that backlight glow to them (on a good screen)? Are they even a problem anymore with DLP projectors?

 

DLP black levels are much better than LCDs (at all price ranges). If you're a stickler for black levels, I would look at a DLP projector. Viewing angles are not a problem for projectors like they are for CRT rear projection TVs (plus there's no reflective glare). The blacks do not have a backlight glow (I've seen that on flat panel LCD monitors) but they just aren't truly black. The best analogy I can make is it looks like the black levels do in a movie theater, not truly black but black enough to where you don't notice it (at least I don't, YMMV).

 

From what I've heard/read so far, and knowing how picky I am, my initial reaction is that a 720p DLP projector would be nice. Not sure I want to spend that much, but a demo could persuade me to save for one. I'll have to look into HT stores in my area...

 

I think 720p DLP projectors start at around $3,000+ right now. It's alot of money but if you end up getting something cheaper that you're not happy with, then you'll probably regret it.

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I've had my InFocus Screenplay 4805 for 6 months, and it is wonderful. I use it to watch SD and HD television, Xbox and Gamecube, and DVDs over DVI with my Mac.

 

My main concern when researching the unit was that it did not support native HD resolutions. I considered a 720p LCD projector, but this thread helped convince me not to. There is a mountain of information, so be forewarned. Basically it boils down to these highlights: stunning color, deep blacks, and bright whites.

 

HD and 480p games are gorgeous. SD and poorly transfered DVDs are not. The large picture size does bring out the worst in a DVD, but also the best. Zero overscan, perfect geometry, and a DVI connection can provide a matchless experience compared to any rear-projection set.

 

The bulb life on the 4805 is 3000 hours for standard mode, and 4000 hours in low-light mode (what I have used from hour 1). I worry about not being able to find a reasonably priced replacement bulb when the time comes. My father had a FP from a company that went out of business and he was forced to buy a new projector. Honestly I don't feel this is as bad as it sounds. If my bulb only lasts four years (that's averaging more than 2.5 hours a day), I'm guessing I'll be ready for an HD projector by then and won't even bother replacing the bulb.

 

I have a room with dimensions similar to yours and I do find myself having to look up at the screen. I plan to make the viewing angle much easier on my neck when we move into our new home next month. At 12' back, I have a 7' picture. My couch is about 10 ft from the screen, and there is slight pixelization if you look for it. However, when I stand up and move back a couple of feet the pq improves and loses the screen-door effect. Again, I hope to rectify this problem in the new house.

 

The projector is constantly connected to my Mac, but I don't use it for work, just for watching DVDs. When I have company over for a movie I use an application that will do full screen looping of movie files. So I stick in a bunch of downloaded trailers and have them on in the background as people show up and settle in. I feel it really adds to the movie theater feel I am trying to mimic.

 

And if you haven't clicked on the links Masta supplied, do it. They are the two best places to learn about FPs.

 

Pieter

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With regard to the replacement bulbs, think of them like car parts. What would you think is easier to find a part of a 86 Mustang or a 86 Porsche...get something that is popular enough to keep the parts market profitable for years to come and you'll never have a hard time finding a replacement part. I have a slide projector that is over 20 years old, yet I can still get a bulb for it.

 

Sounds like you would really enjoy a DLP projector over the LCD. The newer LCDs have some really good contrast ratios, but the DLPs are starting to be able to compete well with the CRTs in the black level arena. The best thing for you to do is to start looking for places with them setup so you get a first hand impression. Almost all of the places that have them setup for you to see what they are like wont mind if you bring in your own content to test with.

 

Dean

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The one thing to be wary of with single chip consumer DLP devices is to see whether you are susceptible to rainbow issues. The unfortunate thing here is knowing whether you are or not can often depend upon the viewing conditions when watching a projected image at the time of demonstration. So you might not see them in a store, but see them at home, or vice versa…etc. Of course, you may not see them at all in any situation. I’m incredibly prone to them in various conditions and I’d hate to find one I was fine with at home, have friends or family to watch a film with me and find my guests were susceptible to seeing them.

 

Don’t be frightened by potential rainbows issues, it’s just something worth keeping in mind. More modern colour wheels certainly are helping to make the issue less of a problem, but they still can’t eradicate it altogether.

 

Daniel

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Is there an estimate for what percentage of people see rainbows?

 

I've really no idea. It's such a strange phenomenon but I'd certainly say the number of people who don't see them greatly outweigh the number who do. I’d love a DLP device right about now as they’re very good value for money. I’m just personally too fickle to want to risk it.

 

Daniel

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Fan noise is only really a concern when there's no other audio (like when the movie is at a silent part). In most cases, it becomes ambient noise your brain filters out, like the sound of the refrigerator running.

 

Agreed. I rarely notice my X1's fan. Normally the dog, the refrigerator, or something else is what I notice. The fan noise is constant and is quickly tuned out IMO

 

Don't be afraid of a cheap 800x600 pj if you want to try the concept out. pj's aren't too hard to get rid of if you get them on a good deal. Woot.com recently had the Infocus 4800 (same as X1) refurbed for $499. You can find refurbed Infocus 4805s @ $750. I think I would prefer new for the better warranty coverage, myself, but still, at $499, it's replaceable.

 

You also have to decide if you want widescreen or not. Personally I prefer 4:3 as you get a huge 4:3 picture that way, and the 16:9 image is the same size. I don't mind the black bars, but a big ol 4:3 image is awesome. Since we watch plenty of TV on DVD, a smattering of classic and 4:3 indy films, and I play lots of games on it, I preferred 4:3. :D

 

Recommended reading: http://www.projectorcentral.com/formats.htm

 

My bulb has like 1400 hours on it, I think, since January of last year. X1 bulbs are rated for 3000-4000 hours, so I'm sure I'll get a new 720p DLP before I replace the bulb.

 

You wouldn't want to run it for normal use, though. You'd blow through bulbs pretty quick, and it wouldn't be terribly good for webbrowsing IMO.

 

I'm not entirely satisfied with my black levels (2000:1 contrast), as it still suffers in very dark scenes. I was going to go Panasonic plasma before budget made me for for my projector - I am much more concerned with blacks, etc than resolution. I can't imagine going any lower contrast ratio than this.

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I second the vote for the Infocus 4805. For the money (~$1000), you can't beat it. I've had mine for about 7 months, and have loved every minute of it.

 

On the rainbow front, I've heard that it affects 10% of people. I saw a couple when I first got it and was projecting on a blank wall, but after going with a gray screen (actually, just very thin wallboard that I painted gray), I haven't seen any. I've probably had 40 or 50 people over to watch movies and/or play Xbox, and nobody has mentioned seeing rainbows. I think it's one of those "if you look hard enough, you'll be able to see it" type of things. If you're not looking CLOSELY for them, you'll never see them...

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You also have to decide if you want widescreen or not. Personally I prefer 4:3 as you get a huge 4:3 picture that way, and the 16:9 image is the same size. I don't mind the black bars, but a big ol 4:3 image is awesome. Since we watch plenty of TV on DVD, a smattering of classic and 4:3 indy films, and I play lots of games on it, I preferred 4:3. :D

 

Mine is 4:3 as well, and I do like it especially for gaming. But if I was buying a projector today, I'd take a long look at the NEC HT1100, which comes with a flip-up anamorphic lens for converting 4:3 to 16:9, so you get the best of both worlds in one projector (with the side-benefit of increased vertical resolution in 16:9 mode)! It's not particularly cheap, though at about $3k.

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On the rainbow front, I've heard that it affects 10% of people. I saw a couple when I first got it and was projecting on a blank wall, but after going with a gray screen (actually, just very thin wallboard that I painted gray), I haven't seen any.

 

I saw rainbows a lot on my 2x wheel X1, initially - I was going to return it to CC and wait for the 4805 to come out...but I couldn't give it up and go back to my 27".

 

I always saw rainbows pretty much only with white on black scenes - I would catch rainbowy flashes, like in FOTR in Moria - the blades in the dark cave would be all rainbow-y. 5x wheeled stuff (like the DLP RPTVs) I couldn't see rainbows unless I tried very hard.

 

But I did notice that when I moved to the new house and set up the X1, they are almost completely gone.

 

Things that changed:

1) Longer shooting distance. This means less effective lumens - less bright screen (a key factor in rainbows)

2) My blackout cloth screen was too small ( I kinda tossed it together at the old house - it was 4 ft by 6ft IIRC). Now I shoot on the wall until I build a new screen. The wall is white, but with a slight baby-blueish tint (I tried to adjust by turning down the blue on the projector).

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I am not susceptible to the single-chip DLP rainbow effect but I did suffer from a headache and slight nausea when I went to my friend's house to watch his Infocus SP4805. I'd love to get a single-chip DLP projector like the Infocus SP4805 or the Optoma H31 but the thought of having a headache or nausea when I watch it (or when other family members/guests do) makes me extremely reluctant to purchase one.

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I am not susceptible to the single-chip DLP rainbow effect but I did suffer from a headache and slight nausea when I went to my friend's house to watch his Infocus SP4805. I'd love to get a single-chip DLP projector like the Infocus SP4805 or the Optoma H31 but the thought of having a headache or nausea when I watch it (or when other family members/guests do) makes me extremely reluctant to purchase one.

 

Another medical marijuana candidate. ;)

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I am not susceptible to the single-chip DLP rainbow effect but I did suffer from a headache and slight nausea when I went to my friend's house to watch his Infocus SP4805.

 

This feeling could be due the fact that you are watching on a much bigger screen than you were used to. My wife got a couple of headaches from the projector at first...

 

When you are watching on a big screen like that you get a lot more side-to-side eye flicker than you normally would (kinda like sitting too close in the theater). You can also get eyestrain the same way.

 

But it might also be the DLP technology. I've seen some stories of people getting nauseous from it.

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This feeling could be due the fact that you are watching on a much bigger screen than you were used to. My wife got a couple of headaches from the projector at first...

 

When you are watching on a big screen like that you get a lot more side-to-side eye flicker than you normally would (kinda like sitting too close in the theater). You can also get eyestrain the same way.

 

I kind of doubt it since I have a 85" screen at home. :D

 

I'm thinking of giving single-chip DLP a shot though when the bulb on my Z1 goes out. If I don't have headaches/eyestrain (or I can get used to it), then an Optoma H31 or Infocus 4805 would be a nice and relatively inexpensive upgrade to my Z1 (especially when I factor in the $300 I would have to spend on a new bulb for the Z1).

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