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The universe is finite?!


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http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/space/10/09/u...reut/index.html

 

Anyone else read this? Scientists in Paris think they've discovered that the universe has a soccer ball-like structure and that it is indeed finite. I can't even get my mind around that idea. If the universe is finite, what's outside it?! What would happen if you were at the absolute edge of the universe?

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Originally posted by ChoiceStriker@Oct 9 2003, 02:00 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/space/10/09/u...reut/index.html

 

Anyone else read this? Scientists in Paris think they've discovered that the universe has a soccer ball-like structure and that it is indeed finite. I can't even get my mind around that idea. If the universe is finite, what's outside it?! What would happen if you were at the absolute edge of the universe?

The Old Ones would get you.

 

What does soccer ball structure mean? That the universe is spherical with little black and white shapes running all around it? :)

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The universe is finite?!

 

Whew! I just couldn't wrap my head around infinite.

 

Football & baseball fans are going to have issues with the universe being a big soccer ball. They're just gonna have to learn real sports don't allow substitutions and have low scores.

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Yea, the Many Worlds theory is super cool. All sorts of fun possibilities.

 

"... The Many-Worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics ...[was originated by]... Hugh Everett III, ... a graduate student working with Prof. John A. Wheeler at Princeton University in the mid-1950s. ... Everett's PhD dissertation presented his new QM interpretation, a radical approach which uses neither collapsing wave functions nor observer knowledge. Instead it proposes a deceptively simple alternative: the wave function never collapses. Instead, at every occasion where a quantum event has more than one outcome (e.g., when an electron may strike one atom or another), the universe splits. We have one universe where the electron hits atom A, another where it hits atom B, and so on for all of the possible outcomes. Similarly, if a light photon might be transmitted or reflected, if a radioactive atom might decay or not, the universe splits into alternative worlds, with one new universe for each and every potential outcome. This is the Many Worlds (MW) interpretation. From the MW viewpoint, the universe is like a tree that branches and re-branches into myriads of new sub-branches with every passing picosecond. And each of these new branch universes has a slightly different sub-atomic "history". Because an observer happens to have followed one particular path through the diverging branches of this Universe-Tree, he never perceives the splitting. Instead he interprets the resolution of the myriad of possibilities into one particular outcome as a Copenhagen-style collapse. But the observer plays no active role in the splitting. Events at the quantum level, of course, must lead to consequences in the every-day world. There should be a MW universe in which every physically possible event has happened. There should be MW universes where the dinosaurs dominate the planet ... Even as you read this sentence your universe may be fragmenting into a number of branches too large to count. ...
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