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Angry the Clown

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Everything posted by Angry the Clown

  1. Angry the Clown

    Mario + Rabbids Kingdom Battle (Switch)

    The Phantom is without a doubt one of the greatest Mario game bosses ever conceived.
  2. Angry the Clown

    Mario + Rabbids Kingdom Battle (Switch)

    Got to 3-7 tonight. Might see if I can push to finish the core game by Sunday night as I believe there are 4 worlds (?) to play, then unlockable bonuses. The general difficulty level of the game is just right for my tastes. It’s challenging, but the style of turn based gameplay is actually rather relaxing. Boss fights are getting tougher. The World 3 mid level boss took several attempts as you’re swarmed by so many regular enemies that it’s all too easy to find yourself bombarded. I had to keep my team far enough apart to flank the boss, but close enough to use Rabbid Peach’s team health boost. Bwahhhh!
  3. Angry the Clown

    UHD (4k) Blu-ray Discussion Thread

    The non Collector’s Ed Carpenter discs appear to be landing in March as well as Amazon UK have listings up (£20 each). They’re listed for the 18th. Again, it’s possible they will lack the bonus features discs.
  4. "But this is HD TV. It's got better resolution than the real world" I thought with Dean's 4k hardware thread (here) it is perhaps time to split off UHD disc discussion from the regular Blu-ray thread and have one dedicated to the new format for those of us interested in moving over to it either now or in the not too distant future. I felt it best to also begin with a primer that I've written up below, which I hope covers all the need to know basics about the new format, what it is, and what you're actually getting. At the time of writing, the following studios/distributors have pledged support for the UHD Blu-ray format: 20th Century Fox Lionsgate Paramount Shout Factory Sony/Columbia Pictures Universal Walt Disney Entertainment Warner Bros Currently (of the remaining majors) MGM is the remaining holdout and have not indicated when they will begin releasing titles. For the time being at least, all of the supporting distributors above are dedicated to releasing their titles as UHD/1080 Blu-ray/Digital Copy combo packs, so if you shop around you could start building your collection now at an acceptable price to avoid double dipping down the line and just get by with enjoying the regular included Blu-ray disc in the interim. Blu-ray.com's 4K Release Calendar is a useful resource to see what titles have been released and which titles are coming soon: http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/releasedates.php?4k=1 What's the difference (1080 Blu vs UHD Blu)? Disc Capacity: UHD Blu-ray is an extension of the existing Blu-ray spec. The format can use existing 50GB discs, as well as unique 66GB and 100GB capacity discs. At the time of writing the 66GB discs appear to be the standard, with there being some manufacturing and yield holdups delaying the rollout of 100GB titles (this is perhaps why UHD discs are barebones at the moment, generally opting to leave special features to any included 1080 Blu-ray discs). Region coding: Rejoice! UHD Blu-ray is a 100% region free format (though be aware that any included 1080p Blu-ray in a combo pack release may not be). Resolution, video codec, bitrates and colour space: "4k" in the home is carries a resolution of 3840x2160 (UHD). Unlike the early years of Blu-ray, UHD Blu has spared us the tedium of a video codec war and bases the spec exclusively on HEVC (High Efficiency Video Coding)/H.265. 50 GB discs support bitrates of up to 82 Mbit/s, 66 GB discs support up to 108 Mbit/s, and 100 GB discs will support up to 128 Mbit/s, well above any UHD streaming/download service. The format also uses 4:2:0 chroma sub-sampling at 10bit (vs Blu-ray's 8bit) and UHD being Rec.2020 based, vs Rec.709 we've been living with for decades, also brings with it support for a much higher colour gamut. 3D Support and High Frame Rates: UHD Blu does NOT support 3D in the spec, so you will not see 3D UHD discs on the market. Players and UHD TVs may still offer backward compatibility with regular 1080 3D Blu-rays however. Unlike 1080 Blu, UHD Blu-ray supports higher frame rates up to 60fps. Dolby Atmos/DTS-X: Although there are a number of 1080 Blu-rays featuring the new immersive height channel "object" based audio formats, there's some early indication that studios are looking to make this an exclusive feature on their UHD discs instead (to encourage people to upgrade). Certain Fox releases, like Peanuts and Deadpool for example, only feature DTS HD MA on the regular 1080 Blu whilst having Atmos tracks on the UHD equivalents. Sony are looking like the most aggressive supporters of Atmos on the UHD disc format, applying it to as many of their catalogue titles as possible, not just new releases. Are all movies released to UHD disc genuinely UHD resolution? This is complicated, but actually, no, many are not. Studios have been gradually making moves to archive their libraries in 4k for a few years now (some, Sony for example, more aggressively than others). Ironically, it is catalogue titles shot on film that potentially stand to benefit the most from 4K masters compared to many modern movies shot digitally, this is primarily because of the fixed resolutions of sub-4k digital cameras in the past, and that many movies, even if captured at higher resolutions, have still had masters completed for their digital cinema release at 2k for one reason or another. Likewise, CG animated movies are not generally rendered above 2k. So upscaled movies are a rip off? Not quite. Mad Max Fury Road for example was shot primarily on the Arri Alexa at 2.8k and was post-produced and finished in 2k. Despite those kind of production specs, the more modern video codec and higher bitrates on UHD Blu can still (though this may not be true in every instance) potentially yield a noticeable improvement in fine detail vs the regular Blu-ray. Being professionally upscaled at the source ahead of being mastered for disc may also yield noticeable improvements. Cinematographer God Roger Deakins is a big advocate for the benefits of upscaling in post (Sicario was shot at the Alexa's highest resolution of 3.4k, but upscaled to 4k for its digital intermediate ahead of theatrical release). In short, don't get too hung up on the native resolution of a finished film. Accept that some movies on UHD Blu are going to look noticeably better than their 1080 Blu-ray counterparts in terms of perceivable differences in detail, but we're never going to be looking at a DVD > Blu-ray style leap in resolution here. Very fine details, more natural grain retention, reduced banding effects and fewer compression artifacts are where some of the central benefits are most likely to be seen. We're basically being handed quality much closer to that of a theatrical DCP presentation in this regard. Enthusiasts have never had it so good, and then there's the HDR factor.... HDR (High Dynamic Range): This, far more than trying to let the increase in resolution influence customers, is in fact the main reason content makers and hardware manufacturers believe people are going to want to move up from 1080p. In addition to huge leaps in colour, the concept behind HDR mastering for movies is to present the greater degrees of latitude modern cameras have been capable of capturing, but display devices have thus far rendered impossible to replicate (this goes double for anything shot on film, which can still boast higher dynamic range than many digital movie cameras, too). Any LCVG'ers familiar with photography and messing around with RAW photo files in Photoshop, Lightroom...etc will basically understand what this concept is all about. At the lowest point of an image you have shadows, and at the highest point you have highlights. HDR colour grading of movies can potentially allow us to see move detail in these peak areas than ever before. This is a very basic example, but imagine a scene where the sun shines bright. Typically the highlights might blow out any fine details of clouds in the sky in such an image, but HDR has the potential to pull that fine detail back. The vast majority of movies today go through a digital intermediate (DI) process. This is where the original digital camera files are colour graded or, if the movie was photographed on film, the film elements are scanned digitally and then graded in the computer. The digital intermediate colour grade is one job in itself, but an HDR pass requires its own unique grade by the colorists (ideally supervised by a cinematographer). It was recently mentioned at a Fox press event that Deadpool for example had several separate colour grades covering everything from the regular digital projection release, the digital IMAX release, the digital laser IMAX release, a digital Dolby Vision theatrical release, the rec 709 Blu-ray and the HDR10 pass for the UHD Blu. That's a lot of work, and may not even yield colour consistencies from version to version. Indeed, it may explain why there is apparently quite a difference in colour between the Blu-ray and UHD releases of Mad Max Fury Road (though the UHD's HDR master was supposedly supervised by the filmmakers). Because we're not allowed a new format without some kind of competing standard: UHD Blu-ray discs actually have the potential to carry two competing types of HDR content. HDR10, the defacto open standard that is mandated in the format specification, and Dolby Vision. The latter is a more sophisticated method of HDR mastering, most notably in that DV has 4096 possible RGB values against the 1024 values of HDR10, allowing for greater colour reproduction in an image, and works within a 12bit bit depth against HDR10s 10bit depth. Dolby Vision also mandates higher brightness values in the display device and uses metadata for supported hardware to actually render the content on a frame by frame basis for a much greater degree of accuracy as it is constantly in conversation back and forth with your display device to understand what your display's capabilities are (and thus deliver an HDR image optimally tailored for that display). Does UHD Blu-ray even have a future vs streaming? This is all my personal opinion of course, but I think internet speeds (globally) are going to allow room for one last gasp of movies on physical media, and that this is going to be it. Not everyone is going to have the bandwidth to stream 4K into their homes, and the disc based bitrates for this kind of data significantly trumps UHD streaming and downloads, so the enthusiasts are always going to turn to the discs. Look at it another way. We're living in an age where vinyl has made huge comeback. The future of music distribution could literally be divided between streaming... and vinyl! Who in the world would have predicated such a thing? The point is, physical media is not going to go away, but the means in which it is distributed, and who ultimately handles that distribution, is probably where we'll begin to see further shifts in the years to come with movies. It was actually very interesting to read the preliminary hardware sales data shared by the DEG (Digital Entertainment Group) for the first quarter of 2016 that revealed: 4K Ultra HD players launched in the US market and were quickly purchased. With 26 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray releases available in the first quarter, 4K Ultra HD discs experienced impressive sales with consumers buying more than 80,000 discs in their first weeks of launch. This number is two times that of Blu-ray Discs sales in its first weeks of launch. That's encouraging to read, and hopefully provides some insight into the potential growth of the format. Studios have been working towards 4k and HDR for several years now, and from the manufacturing and software side there's not a whole lot that changes at the disc replication plants, whilst the players merely move to new lasers to read the higher capacity discs and add new processing to handle the h.265 codec and HDR. UHD Blu being a relatively basic extension of Blu-ray hopefully makes it a negligible added expense for manufacturers to provide players and for studios to provide discs compared to Blu-ray itself, as it provides fewer excuses for content providers not to support the format even though the physical media market is dwindling. Assuming the PS4 Neo hardware revision also includes support, we'll hopefully see that help propel interest too. I think, whatever happens, it is realistic not to expect the library of available content to ever match that of Blu-ray. The library out there for 1080 Blu has well exceeded my expectations, and while major studios seem less inclined to provide special features or release more obscure titles, they appear more willing to licence movies out to smaller labels who are going from strength to strength. This may well continue into UHD Blu at some stage. Who can say for sure? The format may well end up something akin to laserdisc, which quite frankly I would welcome with open arms even if it meant typical disc prices remaining a little higher than what we're currently used to. Perhaps the studios know UHD Blu is likely to end up even more of an enthusiasts format than Blu-ray itself and that's why they agreed to abandon region coding in the spec?
  5. Angry the Clown

    UHD (4k) Blu-ray Discussion Thread

    Studio Canal's release of The Deer Hunter is getting a film only release in the UK on the 11th of March, minus the chunky box and paraphernalia that was included in last year's collector's release. Pleased to hear it as that's what I've been waiting for. It's under £14 at Amazon right now (possible it lacks the bonus features disc as Amazon only have it down as 2-discs, but that could be an error). Should be similar releases of those Carpenter films to follow by the summer.
  6. Angry the Clown

    UHD (4k) Blu-ray Discussion Thread

    Well Warner UK are doubling down on this with their Twitter PR stating that the extended cut will be on disc. I guess we’ll know for sure whenever rear cover artwork surfaces. It’d be strange if this is a U.K. exclusive. Wouldn’t necessarily be the first time Warner have done something significantly different for the U.K. as we got a better package for Blade Runner with all the bonus discs (movie UHD was the same as US though so this would still set a precedent). The US press release doesn’t specifically state anywhere that the extended cut is digital only, contradicting the notice on the US artwork. In fact it says “4K UHD and Blu-ray Combo Packs include an extended cut with deleted scenes” so I am wondering if the US notification on the artwork is in error and in fact it should read that the 4K and Blu are ONLY the extended cut, while the streaming offers both? We’ll see.
  7. Angry the Clown

    Soundtracks, Soundtracks, Soundtracks

    Completely missed the announcement of Intrada's two-disc release of Apollo 13: http://store.intrada.com/s.nl?it=A&id=11453 I'm....... over the moon (*cough*) about this one as it has long be a favourite of mine. Hopefully one of the labels is working on more Horner expansions (the big ones for me I think would be remasters/expansions of Land Before Time, Willow and Sneakers).
  8. So, with a view some of us have had to generating more discussion topics I've felt compelled to split off soundtrack/film score discussion from the main music thread and give them their own home. 2010 has been a remarkably shite year for new, quality, film scores (with the bulk of the best releases being catalogue announcements from Filmscore monthly, Intrada et al). One new score I am looking forward to however is Alexandre Desplat's score for Harry Potter (his first, and perhaps only, contribution to the series as it remains a mystery whether he is signed to score pt2 of the final movie). It's still lacking a track listing, but out of nowhere an elaborate $84 four-disc gift set edition has cropped up on Amazon. A complete score release would be impressive, but I'm not convinced. Most curious.
  9. Perhaps, yes, but we may be talking heads in jars by that point. Don’t forget it’s one thing for TVs to keep improving on peak luminance, and another thing for them to keep inproving on increasing their native handling of HDR’s bt.2020 max colour volume. We’re sort of lingering around 73% for the latter on some of today’s best displays, though TCL were boasting that they’ve achieved over 90% in prototypes at CES. Whatever rapid improvements we see to displays I think we can most assuredly expect the release of exclusively static HDR content to fade away and take the future to be various flavours of dynamic metadata based HDR because of the varying standards of how content can be delivered. HDR10/HDR10+ can go to 4000nits for example, Dolby Vision to 10,000 and HLG to (I think) 5000 if the content creators so choose. Dolby Vision does also carry with it 12bit matadata which tests have shown even seems to be of benefit even downconverted to contemporary 10bit panels, so if it’s native 12bit 10,000nit 100% bt.2020 displays that are going to be the optimal standard then we may be waiting some time.
  10. So I thought we'd stop the post your photos thread from getting clogged with by tech talk by creating a dedicated hardware and technical discussion thread. There seems no better time to do so as we're not far from the official unveiling of Canon's 5D MK3 in Shanghai, but the leaks now appear to be coming in full force. From an australian retailer: SPECS: (looking real but may not be completely accurate until we have the details officially from Canon) 22.3 Megapixel Full Frame CMOS sensor DiG!C 5+ Image Processor ISO 100-25600 (expandable to L:50 H1:51200, H2: 102400 Full HD Movie (ISO 100-12800 (H:25600) High Performance Operation 61-point high-density reticular AF (up to 41 crosstype points) 6.0 fps for high continuous shooting Intelligent viewfinder with approx. 100% coverage 3.2-type, approx.1.04m dot (3:2 wide) Clear View LCD II iFCL metering with 63-zone dual-layer sensor Shutter durability of 150,000 cycles High end features Silent & low vibration modes Dual card slots (CF & SD) High Dynamic Range (HDR) Mode Multiple Exposures Comparative Playback function Improved durability & water and dust resistance Available Colours Black Megapixels 22MP Sensor Size 36 x 24mm ISO/Sensitivity 100 - 25600 Autofocus Points 61 points Lens Mount Canon LCD Size 3.2" Liveview Yes Viewfinder Optical TTL Min Shutter Speed 30 sec Max Shutter Speed 1/8000 sec Continuous Shooting Speed 6 fps Self Timer 10 sec, 2 sec Metering Centre-weighted, Spot, Evaluative, Partial Video Resolution Full HD 1080 Memory Type Compact Flash Connectivity USB 2, HDMI, Mic Input, Wireless (optional) Battery LP-E6 Battery Type Lithium-ion Charger Includes Li-Ion Charger File Formats AVI, RAW, H.264, MOV, MPEG-4 Dimensions 152 x 116 x 76mm Box Contents Battery Pack LP-E6 .. Battery Charger LC-E6 .. AV Cable AVC-DC400ST .. Interface Cable IFC-200U .. Eyecup Eg .. Wide Strap EWEOS5DMKIII .. CR1616 Lithium Battery Skill Level Professional, Semi-Professional Lifestyle Uses Portrait, Sports, Travel/Landscape http://www.teds.com....eos-5d-mark-iii (listed $4200, body only, price is in Australian dollary-doos)
  11. Right. Yeah the multi layers of a disc being the culprit sounds familiar to something I’d read once (as far as the hang ups delaying DV on disc hen it as always common on streaming is concerned, anyway). I wonder if there will ever come a day where understanding HDR doesn’t make your head hurt and has 100% defined standards. 😀
  12. Interesting. I never got to the bottom of what makes Dolby Vision more complicated on disc, compared to Dolby Vision streaming. There is absolutely a difference, we know that much, as it partially resulted in why it took so much longer for DV to arrive on disc as the encoder requirements were seemingly so much different to encoders for streaming, and Disney also were allegedly unhappy with the issues on the physical media end hence them dropping support a while back (every chance they will regain confidence of course, and some have claimed it’s less the encoding issues causing concern but the decoding variables, such as the headaches Sony have faced, that put Disney off as Disney wants to ensure consistency for consumers with their products. I’ve no idea what’s true. Some have Claimed Pixar were not happy with DV encoding tests that they did and that their concerns spread to Disney as a whole causing them to abandon it. Coco’s director when questioned on Twitter I believe was the source for that information, at least in commenting about why Coco didn’t have Dolby Vision on disc).
  13. You’d have to ask yourself what you really want, whether the BIG screen experience of having a projector is of greater value vs improved contrast, HDR performance and all the other bells and whistles of a flat panel. I think there’s still an immensely compelling argument to be made for having a great projector over a flat panel. If I had the money and a dedicated light controlled room I wouldn’t hesitate to prioritise a projector over a TV, but great HDR and Wide Colour Gamut capable projectors are still few and may exceed what you’re willing to spend. Iain covered it well, really. HDR is a minefield of variables. Projectors, even dual stacked, just can’t get as bright as flat panels, and short of some miracle breakthrough they never will. Theatrical Dolby Vision for example has a max value of 108nits (no zero missing there. One hundred and eight), that’s what theatrical DV is mastered to. At home, HDR/Dolby Vision can be mastered for up to 10,000nits by comparison, with 4000nits generally being the current accepted max standard for movies (these encoding metadata values vary depending on the studio and mastering monitor they use, but it’s important to note that those are maximum encoding figures baked into the metadata. Blade Runner 2049 for example reads as being encoded as 10,000nit on the US Warner disc, and 4000 on the U.K Sony disc if you bring up the display info on a capable player. In actuality the film’s max CLL level never exceeds 250 or thereabouts. Confusing gobbledygook I know, but the point is while you will hear 1000nits, 4000nits, 10,000...etc thrown around by manufacturers, it important to note that not all content hits those peaks, and we are talking about peaks here, not a blanket beginning to end brightness value). In short, you can only allow yourself to get so hung up on this issue because we still seem to be a long way away from any display being able to handle whatever HDR content you throw at it optimally. We’ve still not seen consumer TV’s reach 4000nit capability yet. LED/LCD displays are putting out anything between 1200nits/2900nits depending on the model, and OLED technology is unlikely to ever significantly exceed the 800nit max range the best models are currently capable of once calibrated (short of some major breakthrough). When displays cannot display the peaks of some content they have to resort to what is known as “tone mapping,” the approach to which varies from manufacturer to manufacturer but is arguably becoming more sophisticated year on year, and is basically a TV or projector’s way of compensating for max brightness values it can’t display natively. HDR is really not about max bright and dark values, but preserving and displaying details in those values. Consumer projectors can deliver brighter HDR performance compared to cinemas as the screen sizes are dramatically smaller by comparison to a movie theatre and the projectors are closer to the screen, but you’re still looking at maybe 200-300nit peak performance on the best models in a light controlled environment. Is that a big loss compared to what TV’s are capable of? Personally I’d view BT2020/DCI-P3 support and performance in a projector to be of greater importance than peak brightness capabilities. HDR on the best consumer projectors is still very striking indeed, particularly if paired with a decent player that can do internal tone mapping like Oppo or Panasonic’s players, or better yet an external video processor from Lumagen (but the latter doesn’t come cheap). Again, it’s a matter of looking what how much you’re willing to spend and whether the truly big screen projection experience and more limited HDR performance strikes a better balance compared to a flat panel display.
  14. Angry the Clown

    UHD (4k) Blu-ray Discussion Thread

    Creed 2 on 5th of March (US) with Dolby Vision and Atmos.
  15. Returning to this. I had missed Hisense's demo at CES of what they are branding ULED XD, which is sandwiching a 1080p monochromatic panel with a quantum dot 4k panel to achieve exceptionally high contrast performance...etc. The monochromatic panel controls the luminance with the demo display allegedly able to hit a 2900nit peak brightness. This isn't new technology as its been used in some industry monitors before, but it's the first I've seen of it being implemented for consumer displays: https://www.engadget.com/2019/01/07/hisense-ces-2019/ It's expected to debut to the Chinese market later this year. If it's become more feasible at a consumer level then it would be exciting if, over the next year or two, we find out that the likes of Sony and Panasonic have been putting R&D into it. LCD still has some really interesting places it could go over the next few years.
  16. Angry the Clown

    Mario + Rabbids Kingdom Battle (Switch)

    Have reached World 3. I’m delighted that it features the Boos. If I had one complaint about Mario Odyssey it was their absence.
  17. I thought with the music thread, and notably the soundtracks thread, drifting heavily into vinyl discussion recently that it might be nice to have a dedicated topic to discuss new releases, as well as hardware (turntables, amps, speakers and so on). We've had the "is vinyl better?" discussion elsewhere, and I'm a believer in saying that it is merely different. It IS a pure indulgence for music nerds, and probably should not be seen as anything more this day in age. You're either attracted to the uniqueness of it all, or you're not. I'm still without a turntable, chiefly on account of having decided to save up more and invest in Rega's new Planar 3 over the Planar 2 I had initially been eyeing. I'm of two minds whether to save up even more and couple it with Rega's new brio amp which is due out in early 2017. I'm limited for space these days however, so since I don't have a home theatre set up I'll be listening via headphones for a good while, and the new brio amp finally adds a headphone jack. An expensive amp just for headphone use, but long term I'd be hooking speakers up to it (it's long term thinking that will likely see me go for a Planar 3 over a Planar 2, since I'm a chump and expect I'd be thinking about the 3 if I got its slightly cheaper brother). .... One day.... One day.... I've also looked at Onkyo's A-9010 amp which boasts a performance that far exceeds its price. It's especially impressive that it boasts so many great reviews from the press and users alike, AND has a dedicated internal headphone amp as well as built in phono stage. Gramaphone gave it a glowing review last year. My vinyl collecting is relatively conservative. I see it as my special collection of the essentials, albums with special and emotional relevance to me, and I'd like to have the catalogues of my favourite artists entirely on vinyl (Beatles, Bowie, Radiohead...etc). These are albums I want to sit and listen to, and not just throw on as background noise. Thus far I've primarily only been buying some limited edition Mondo soundtrack releases so as not to miss out on the ones I want in future when I finally have the means to enjoy them.
  18. Angry the Clown

    Apple Discussion Thread

    I thought the re-design was supposed to be this year, following what was apparently going to be the charging box variation rumoured for last year. Perhaps they opted to delay an interim update given how well the mk1 models are selling in favour of rolling updates into one later in 2019? I’m still on the fence about wireless headphones, but I am quite curious about the pods.
  19. Angry the Clown

    Apple Discussion Thread

    Has there been much progress on the Mac Mini/eGPU front? I stopped keeping track of compatibility updates.
  20. Angry the Clown

    Xbox One X - Available November 7th 2017 - $499.99

    I never did play Shadow of Mordor. Another one for "the list"
  21. Well, the reveal is about thirty minutes away at the time of writing. Game Trailers seems to be the official stream partner, but it appears that there are some alternative links as well, including the Xbox Youtube channel. http://www.youtube.com/user/xbox http://www.gametrailers.com http://www.ustream.tv/gametrailers 10:00 AM US PST 13:00 PM US EST 18:00 PM UK GMT Can't be as cringe inducing as what we endured eight years ago, right? .... Right?
  22. Angry the Clown

    UHD (4k) Blu-ray Discussion Thread

    And yet the UK art has a sticker on it boasting about the extended cut. Would Warner be so stupid as do that on the box for a disc only for it to apply exclusively to the download code? Artwork is always subject to change, mind you (and it does even say TBC at the top).
  23. Angry the Clown

    UHD (4k) Blu-ray Discussion Thread

    UK/Euro steelbook for Pet Semetary is nice. Safe to assume US will get this too as the discs here show US rating logos: 25th of March release in the UK: https://www.zoom.co.uk/product/pet_sematary_30th_anniversary_limited_edition_4k_steelbook_4k_ultra_hd_blu_ray_uhd I know Paramount get a double cash in with this one (both anniversary of the original and riding off the back of the forthcoming remake), but honestly if we get this, THIS, and go the whole year without the classic and TNG era cast Star Trek films to cash in on the Motion Picture's 40th Anniversary then it would be extraordinarily baffling.
  24. How many Marvel films are coming out this year? Captain Marvel, Avengers, Spider-man. Is there a fourth after that?
  25. The game this was canned for... has now been canned.
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